ECR Fellowships: University of York’s Centre for Future Health

Closing date: 31st March 2018

Duration: 2 years from 1st October 2018

Four prestigious Fellowships are available through the University of York’s Centre for Future Health (https://www.york.ac.uk/future-health/) to support world-class early career researchers in the broad domain of health. The scheme is jointly funded by the Wellcome Trust and the University of York and is open to individuals from across the arts and humanities, sciences and social sciences. Fellowships offer salary in the range of £38,882 – £47,722 per annum for two years starting from 1st October 2018 and project expenses of up to £100,000.

This scheme is intended to provide a stepping stone for the ablest post-doctoral early career researchers to begin a fully-established, independent and externally-funded research career. Previous Fellows worked in areas including history, Medieval studies, social sciences, neuroscience, biophysics, molecular and cell biology, electronics. 

Applicants with interdisciplinary interests and those who have some professional experience from another institution, academic or non-academic, are particularly welcome. We are also pleased to receive applications from people who have had a career break (because of family commitments, ill health or to take on work outside of research) and who wish to re-establish their research career.

Further Information:

The University of York (http://www.york.ac.uk) is a thriving UK Russell group University with particular strengths in the domain of health research and the biomedical sciences including the medical humanities, mental health, neuroscience, infectious diseases, health and social science. 

For more details about the scheme, please see https://www.york.ac.uk/future-health/fellowships/.

How to Apply:

Please visit https://jobs.york.ac.uk/wd/plsql/wd_portal.show_job?p_web_site_id=3885&p_web_page_id=337183 to start your application

The York Centre for Future Health (cfh@york.ac.uk) can advise on all aspects of the application process including eligibility and the first stage of identifying a suitable academic sponsor in the applicant’s target department.

Scoping Event: major health collections in Glasgow City Archives

Call for Expressions of Interest

Glasgow Life in conjunction with the Medical Humanities Research Centre and the College of Arts in the University of Glasgow invite expressions of interest from researchers who may wish to work with the internationally significant medical history and humanities collections held in the Glasgow City Archives, Mitchell Library. The following major collections were catalogued with Wellcome Trust funding, and are eligible for Wellcome’s Research Bursary Scheme (funding up to £25k, see https://wellcome.ac.uk/funding/research-bursaries), other Wellcome schemes, and those of other funders.

Glasgow Public Health Records
Glasgow has an unenviable reputation in respect of the health chances of its citizens. Ill health and disease within Glasgow was entrenched during the first half of the nineteenth century as a result of large-scale migration. The scale of the problems and the work by Glasgow’s pioneering Medical Officers of Health and its Sanitary Officers, form a major part of the collections.

(1) Department Of Public Health records, including annual reports of the Medical Officer of Health and Sanitary Inspector, 1863-1985; reports on Glasgow housing conditions, 1911-1923; housing photographs, c1902-1944; returns of infectious diseases, 1920-1973; Port Local Authority files, 1901-1969; papers of Medical Officers of Health, 1892-c1959; publications by staff of the Public Health Department, 1897-1974.

(2) Police Commissioners. Prior to the establishment of the Public Health Department in 1895, the Commissioners were responsible for all aspects of public health. Their records date back to 1800 and include: minutes of Nuisances, Sanitary and Health Committees, 1856-1910; minutes of Hospitals Committees, 1867-1914; minutes of the Port Local Authority, 1903-1910.

(3) Annexed Burghs. The 13 burghs which surrounded Glasgow were gradually absorbed as the city expanded. As independent burghs of varying duration, they had public health functions. They include: Gorbals (1700-1900); Govan (1853-1912); Govanhill (1876-1891); Hillhead (1867-1891); Maryhill (1856-1891); Partick (1852-1912); Pollokshaws (1813-1912).

(4) Scottish Women’s Hospital. During WW1 UK female physicians developed, staffed, and led their own voluntary organisations serving honourably and often under direct fire, on the Western Front. Of these, the Scottish Women’s Hospitals for Foreign Service (SWH) represented the largest medical endeavour completely directed by British women doctors. The SWH made a crucial contribution to the delivery of medical care during the First World War, sending out 14 medical units to serve in France, Serbia, Salonika, Russia, Romania, Corsica and Malta.

A scoping event is planned for 2-4pm, Wednesday 14th February 2018 in the Mitchell Library. City Archives staff will introduce the collections, display illustrative materials, and facilitate the development of related research projects. A key, but not exclusive objective, will be to assist in bids to the Wellcome’s Research Bursary Scheme for scoping projects, with a first round deadline in 2018 of 2 April 2018.

If you are interested, please contact Dr Irene O’Brien (irene.o’brien@glasgowlife.org.uk) by 31st January 2018 with your contact details, affiliation and level and stating which collections and particular materials you are interested in, your initial research idea, as well as any particular schemes and funders. The event is open to academic researchers of postgraduate level and above.

CFP: New Historical Perspectives on Ageing and the Life Course, Leeds

Date: 19th – 20th March 2018

Location: Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds

Deadline: 30th November 2017

In recent decades, global research activity around ageing and the life course has grown exponentially. Work in the clinical sciences, and in the established field of gerontology, has explored the challenges and opportunities of ageing through investigations focusing on biological and biosocial elements. More recently, scholars in the humanities and the social sciences working in the field of ageing studies have been turning their attentions to the topic, offering interdisciplinary cultural and social analyses that are theoretically, politically, and empirically engaged. Within this category, a number of scholars across academic disciplines including history of medicine, philosophy, film studies, literature, law, sociology, psychology, and anthropology – and in the cross-disciplinary field of medical humanities – are united by a shared interest in historical perspectives on youth, ageing, and old age.

This two-day conference will bring together scholars whose work engages with the past, to share new perspectives on the role and value of historical approaches to ageing across disciplines in the humanities and the social sciences. Several key questions will frame the event:

  • What can historical research on ageing and the life-course in the humanities and social sciences offer that is distinctive from modes of enquiry in these areas in the clinical sciences?
  • To consider ageing in historical contexts is to encounter issues of disciplinary boundaries and hierarchies, dominant histories, and canonicity. What is the specific nature of these challenges, and how might they be navigated?
  • Is it enough to reconstruct historical, socio-cultural contexts of ageing? Or should historical projects also develop innovative approaches that will address present-day issues?
  • How might scholars in the humanities and social sciences whose work includes historical approaches work together across disciplinary boundaries?
  • Who are the audiences for historical research in ageing? How might we communicate effectively with the academic sciences, with non-academic audiences, and with policy-makers and public-health organisations?
  • What are the broader implications of this kind of work for developing further knowledge and understanding of the role of historical approaches to the study of human health, disability, disease, minds, and bodies?

We invite contributions in the form of 20-minute papers from scholars at any career stage, and from any discipline in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, broadly construed. Proposals from doctoral and early-career researchers are particularly welcomed. To submit a proposal, email an abstract of 250-300 words, together with a brief biographical note of no more than 150 words to Dr Catherine Oakley (C.M.C.Oakley@leeds.ac.uk), by 30th November 2017.

Papers might engage with the questions outlined above from a particular disciplinary perspective. Further topics could include, but are not restricted to:

  • Senescence and old age
  • Rejuvenation and anti-ageing
  • Childhood, adolescence, and youth
  • Ageing and scientific technologies
  • Families and intergenerational relationships
  • Age and demographic change
  • Ageing in visual and material cultures
  • Ageing, gender, sex and sexuality
  • Work, retirement, and pensions
  • Ethics of ageing
  • Age, ageing, and youthfulness in popular culture
  • Global perspectives on age and ageing

Confirmed keynote speakers include Dr Hyung Wook Park (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) whose recent book Old Age, New Science posits a close relationship between the emergence of gerontology and changing social perspectives of ageing in the first half of the twentieth century.

The conference is being organised as part of the Arts and Humanities Research Council-funded project “Endless Possibilities of Rejuvenation: Defying Ageing, Defining Youth in Britain, 1919-1948”, led by Dr James Stark at the University of Leeds.

Arts of Breath – series of lecture-performances organised by Life of Breath project, Durham

The Life of Breath Project is pleased to announce ‘Arts of Breath’, a series of lecture-performances exploring the role of breath in poetry, fiction, singing, dance and visual art. All events will take place in Durham. For more information see individual event pages below, or contact Sarah McLusky.

All events are free and everyone is welcome. Most are 6.15pm in ER142, Elvet Riverside, New Elvet, Durham (except *)

The programme launches on Wed 15 November with Prof David Fuller examining Charles Olson’s breath-related theories of poetic structure and how these ideas were taken up by other poets, including William Carlos Williams. To celebrate the launch, this first event will be followed by a drinks reception, which all attendees are welcome to attend.

The featured image is a detail from ‘The Birth of Venus’ by Sandro Botticelli 

Registration open: Cultures of Shame in Medicine, Dublin

Workshop date: 19th September 2017

“Cultures of Shame in Medicine: An Interdisciplinary Workshop” is the third workshop organized by the Wellcome Trust Seed Funded ‘Shame and Medicine Project’.

The aim of this Workshop is to bring together a number of academics working from various disciplinary perspectives within Humanities (e.g. English, History, Visual Culture) in order to reflect on how shame dynamics permeate medical culture and practice.

The workshop will consist of five talks covering diverse topics such as mesothelioma, HIV, surgeon experience and patient narratives. The Workshop takes place on Tuesday 19th September 2017, from 9am – 2pm, in the Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin. Full details of the programme can be found on the project’s website.

All are welcome to attend and registration can be completed through the Workshop’s Eventbrite page.

For any further information, do not hesitate to contact the event’s organizers Dr Barry Lyons or Dr Luna Dolezal.

This workshop is sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, the Trinity Long Room Hub and the University of Exeter.

Postdoctoral Research Associate: ‘Life of Breath Project’, Bristol

The Life of Breath team at the University of Bristol are recruiting a postdoctoral research associate in history of medicine. The post, offered for 2 years, could examine the recent history of COPD, which has not so far been the subject of major historical study. However the PIs are also happy to discuss other ideas for research relevant to the Life of Breath project.

The successful applicant will be mentored by a multidisciplinary team, consisting of Prof Tim Cole (Bristol, history), Prof Gareth Williams (Bristol, medicine and medical history), and Prof Havi Carel (Bristol, project PI).

Applicants should have a PhD in medical history, and research experience in the field. It is not essential that your work is in the specific field of the project, although prior research on breathing and breathlessness would be an advantage. Candidates considering applying for this post are encouraged to contact Professor Havi Carel to discuss their ideas and the post.

Download the full person specification and find out how to apply here

The start date for this post is 1 September 2017. The closing date for applications is midnight Wednesday 21st June 2017.

Conference Registration: ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’, Glasgow

Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures

Date: Monday 3rd – Tuesday 4th April 2017

Location: Wolfson Medical Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LQ

Organizing Committee:

  • Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Ross White, Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
  • Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
  • Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’
  • Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’

The Wellcome Trust-funded conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. Having confirmed the programme of speakers for the event, we are delighted to announce that general registration is open.

Registration:

Registration costs £40 for general admittance, and £15 for students/service users. Ticket price includes attendance at the conference on 3rd-4th April 2017, including lunch and refreshments on both days, and a buffet dinner on Mon 3rd April.To register, and to see our full programme of speakers, please visit our Eventbrite page.

Please email the organisers at arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk if you have any queries.

CFP Extended: ‘Other Psychotherapies’ conference, Glasgow

CFP EXTENDED – new deadline FRIDAY 16th SEPTEMBER 2016

Monday 3rd April – Tues 4th April 2017

University of Glasgow

The Wellcome Trust-funded Conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. The Conference Committee invites abstracts of up to 300 words for 20-minute presentations, to be submitted by no later than Friday 16th September 2016.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
  • Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’
  • Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
  • Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’

University of Glasgow Organizing Committee:

  • Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature
  • Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics
  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences
  • Dr Ross White, Mental Health and Wellbeing

Papers should address one or more of the conference’s four themes:

1. Ancient approaches to psychotherapy
This theme seeks to explore ancient and medieval approaches to psychotherapy from the Egyptian and Babylonian world, the Graeco-Roman antiquity, the Chinese and medieval Islamic and Jewish traditions. It aims to foreground various ancient practices used in ‘the cure of the soul’, investigating the extent to which modern psychiatric techniques draw upon such wisdom traditions. Other key goals will be to distinguish diverse conceptions of selfhood required or advanced in psychotherapeutic settings, and to consider the borders between religion, medicine, and philosophy.

2. Geographies of Psychotherapy
We invite papers that wish to examine the development of psychological ideas and practices and their transformative effect over a range of (global) spaces, sites and places. Although not limited to such themes, we encourage critical debates into the uneven development of psychological practices over time and space, the changing spatialities of caring practices, embodied practices of healing, and writing psychotherapeutic geographies.

3. Postcolonial/Indigenous Psychotherapies
The emergence of different, competing schools of Western psychotherapy has been accompanied by rapid development in the capacity to share knowledge globally. Western psychotherapies are juxtaposed with forms of healing based on markedly different epistemic and philosophical underpinnings. This theme considers whether indigenous forms of healing in LMICs can be viewed as de facto psychotherapies. Attention will focus on the dynamics of power in post-colonial contexts and how this has influenced the perceived credibility of western vs indigenous forms of therapeutic/healing interaction.

4. Subcultural Psychotherapies
We invite critical engagement with the propensity to see subcultural participation (bodybuilding, gaming, body modification, BDSM, Goth, Emo, etc.) as cause or predictor of psychopathology. While remaining open to subcultural pathogenesis, we encourage exploration of subculture’s therapeutic/salutogenic dimensions, including the recovery/survivor movement, popular/mass culture, new religious movements, and anomalous experiences such as mediumship and therianthropy.

Abstract submission
Abstracts (.doc, .docx, .rtf) should be emailed to arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk by no later than 31 August 2016 along with a short biography (100 words or less). Abstracts will be considered by the conference organizing committee, and notifications will be communicated by no later than 30 September 2016.

Journal Issue
There will be an opportunity for a selection of papers presented at the conference to be developed into a thematic issue of the international peer-reviewed journal Transcultural Psychiatry (http://tps.sagepub.com/) that will be entitled ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’.

Downloadable call
A .pdf of this call may be downloaded: OtherpsychsCFP.

Contact details

If you have any queries, please contact us at arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk or via Twitter on @otherpsychs.

Post: Special Collections Project Manager (C18th Medical Humanities), Glasgow

The University of Glasgow Library has secured funding from the Wellcome Trust for a project to transcribe the 18th century catalogues of William Hunter’ s library using our new collections management system, EMu, and need a Project Manager. This twelve month grade 6 post will manage the digital humanities /medical humanities project “William Hunter’s Library: a transcription of the early catalogues”. The post holder will have day to day responsibility for producing a digital edition of William Hunter’s original library catalogue using 18th century sources in Special Collections, overseeing the work of a small transcription team and ensuring outcomes are widely disseminated and publicised. This project is funded by Wellcome (Research Resources for Medical Historians).

For more info see http://www22.i-grasp.com/fe/tpl_glasgow01.asp?newms=jj&id=89930&newlang=1

Closing date for applications is 18th September 2016. If you have any questions, please contact Julie Gardham(Senior Librarian and Head of Special Collections).

t: +44 (0)141 330 3791

www.gla.ac.uk/ASC | twitter: @UofGlasgowASC | Julie.Gardham@glasgow.ac.uk

CFP: ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’, Glasgow

Monday 3rd April – Tues 4th April 2017

University of Glasgow

The Wellcome Trust-funded Conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. The Conference Committee invites abstracts of up to 300 words for 20-minute presentations, to be submitted by no later than 31st August 2016.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
  • Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’
  • Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
  • Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’

University of Glasgow Organizing Committee:

  • Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature
  • Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics
  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences
  • Dr Ross White, Mental Health and Wellbeing

Papers should address one or more of the conference’s four themes:

1. Ancient approaches to psychotherapy
This theme seeks to explore ancient and medieval approaches to psychotherapy from the Egyptian and Babylonian world, the Graeco-Roman antiquity, the Chinese and medieval Islamic and Jewish traditions. It aims to foreground various ancient practices used in ‘the cure of the soul’, investigating the extent to which modern psychiatric techniques draw upon such wisdom traditions. Other key goals will be to distinguish diverse conceptions of selfhood required or advanced in psychotherapeutic settings, and to consider the borders between religion, medicine, and philosophy.

2. Geographies of Psychotherapy
We invite papers that wish to examine the development of psychological ideas and practices and their transformative effect over a range of (global) spaces, sites and places. Although not limited to such themes, we encourage critical debates into the uneven development of psychological practices over time and space, the changing spatialities of caring practices, embodied practices of healing, and writing psychotherapeutic geographies.

3. Postcolonial/Indigenous Psychotherapies
The emergence of different, competing schools of Western psychotherapy has been accompanied by rapid development in the capacity to share knowledge globally. Western psychotherapies are juxtaposed with forms of healing based on markedly different epistemic and philosophical underpinnings. This theme considers whether indigenous forms of healing in LMICs can be viewed as de facto psychotherapies. Attention will focus on the dynamics of power in post-colonial contexts and how this has influenced the perceived credibility of western vs indigenous forms of therapeutic/healing interaction.

4. Subcultural Psychotherapies
We invite critical engagement with the propensity to see subcultural participation (bodybuilding, gaming, body modification, BDSM, Goth, Emo, etc.) as cause or predictor of psychopathology. While remaining open to subcultural pathogenesis, we encourage exploration of subculture’s therapeutic/salutogenic dimensions, including the recovery/survivor movement, popular/mass culture, new religious movements, and anomalous experiences such as mediumship and therianthropy.

Abstract submission
Abstracts (.doc, .docx, .rtf) should be emailed to arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk by no later than 31 August 2016 along with a short biography (100 words or less). Abstracts will be considered by the conference organizing committee, and notifications will be communicated by no later than 30 September 2016.

Journal Issue
There will be an opportunity for a selection of papers presented at the conference to be developed into a thematic issue of the international peer-reviewed journal Transcultural Psychiatry (http://tps.sagepub.com/) that will be entitled ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’.

Downloadable call
A .pdf of this call may be downloaded: OtherpsychsCFP.

Contact details

If you have any queries, please contact us at arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk or via Twitter on @otherpsychs.