CFP: ‘Chronicity and Crisis: Time in the Medical Humanities’, Montclair NJ

Location: Montclair State University, New Jersey, USA

Date: 26th – 27th October 2019

An International Conference co-sponsored by the Montclair State University Medical Humanities Program and the Waiting Times Research Group (a Wellcome Trust funded research project based at the Universities of Exeter and Birbeck, London, UK)

Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Mark Solms   Chair, Neuropsychology, University of Cape Town & Groote Schuur Hospital  
Title: “A Man Who Got Lost in Time:  Feeling and Uncertainty in the Face of Oblivion”

Dr. Rishi Goyal   Director, Medicine, Literature and Society Program, Columbia University
Title: “Crisis, Catastrophe and Emergency: Disentangling Temporal Patterns of Care and Response”

Those with interests in general practice, psychotherapy, disability studies, palliative care, end-of-life care, narrative medicine, public health, medical anthropology, medical history, literature and medicine and body studies, and researchers addressing questions of care and temporality within fields such as philosophy, sociology, psychology, critical and cultural studies, gender studies and Black studies are most welcome.

Possible paper and panel topics include:

  • waiting time
  • access and discrimination
  • trauma and urgency
  • suspense and disease in mass media
  • representations of chronic illnesses in art, literature, and film
  • narrative time in medical fiction and nonfiction
  • theories of crisis and chronicity
  • theories of rupture and endurance
  • the temporalities of psychic life

Abstract submissions to be sent to Dr. Jefferson Gatrall by 1st April 2019, at gatrallj@montclair.edu

Organizing committee:

CFP: Research Symposium on Global Genetic Fictions, Leeds

Date: 25th-26th April 2019

Deadline for abstracts: Friday 21st December 2018

Location: Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds

CFP: Research Symposium, Global Genetic Fictions, Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds, 25-26 April 2019

As genetic science develops at breakneck speed, cultural representations register in their form and content changing ideas about the self and personhood, consciousness, behaviour and motivation, heredity, and the boundaries of the human body. And yet, ‘western’ science is only one of a number of frameworks that provide explanations for these phenomena. Knowledge, assumptions and beliefs about what a gene is and what the human genome is, about inheritance, kinship, who owns the body, its parts and ‘data’, are not universal but are culturally produced, culturally interpreted, and culturally situated. For many indigenous communities, for instance, genes may be understood as ‘the ancestors within’ (Grace 1998), a perspective generating different philosophical questions from those raised by ‘western’ scientific frameworks about the make-up of the self and different ethical priorities regarding genetic research.
In this symposium we seek to bring together two recent currents in contemporary biocultural scholarship: a) critical engagement with the representation of ideas from genetic science in media and cultural texts; and b) the development of postcolonial approaches to biomedicine and the life sciences, which interrogate the cultural biases and structural inequalities inherent in these fields. We shall explore the representation of genetic discourse in literature, film, news media, popular culture and philosophy across cultures, and will pay particular attention to representations from the global South.

Confirmed speakers: Prof. Jay Clayton, Vanderbilt; Prof. Clare Hanson, Southampton; Dr Josie Gill, Bristol; Dr Shital Pravinchandra, QMUL; Dr Jerome De Groot, Manchester; Dr Jenny Bangham, Cambridge; Dr Lucy Burke, Manchester Met; Dr Lara Choksey, Exeter.

Topics for consideration may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • How creative works from around the world engage with scientific concepts of the gene, genomics, epigenetics, as well as related ideas including human variation, inheritance and ancestry;
  • How genes, the human genome, heredity, and ownership of genetic information are conceptualised across different cultural frameworks;
  • How cultural texts are both influenced by, and help to shape understandings of, genetic science;
  • How cultural texts negotiate questions of identity (including race, disability, gender, sexuality, and species) in relation to genetics;
  • Representations of genetic research, including its methodologies, dissemination, and ethics;
  • Postcolonial/decolonial/indigenous approaches to the legal, ethical, regulatory, and market frameworks of the life sciences;
  • The relationships between genre, form and genetic representations.

We welcome perspectives from disciplines including literary studies, film studies, history, law, media and cultural studies, critical and cultural theory, philosophy, postcolonial studies, critical medical humanities, disability studies, and bioethics. We are also keen to include participation from creative practitioners (writers, filmmakers, visual artists, performance artists) whose work engages with genetic science, and welcome proposals for creative sessions (film screenings, readings, performances, art exhibits).

Please submit 300-word proposals plus a short bio (100 words) to Clare Barker at c.f.barker@leeds.ac.uk. We also have a limited number of spaces for non-speaking participants; if you would like to attend please submit a short description (200 words max) of how the symposium relates to your field of research, creative or professional practice. The closing date for submissions is Friday 21 December 2018.

This symposium is part of a University of Leeds research project on ‘Genetics and Biocolonialism in Contemporary Literature and Film’ and is funded by a Wellcome Trust Seed Award [grant number 106839/Z/15/Z]. Attendance is free and catering will be provided for all delegates. Accommodation and travel expenses will be covered for all invited speakers.

CFP: ‘Arts for Health’ archives research workshop, Manchester

Date: 10.30am – 4.30pm, Monday 6th August (other dates may be added)

Location: Manchester Metropolitan University

Deadline: 22nd July 2018

Wellcome Collection invites early career researchers to participate in a workshop exploring recently catalogued archives and materials relating to arts and health.

The archives

Centred around the archives of Arts for Health, an organisation based at Manchester Metropolitan University since 1988, these collections bring voices from artists living with health issues, arts in health organisations, art practitioners, and others with experience of the arts in health settings. A rich and exciting resource, these materials capture the changing landscape in which arts and health movements have developed in the UK. Emergent themes from the material include the value of patient voices, the influence of politics and funding, hospital designs and uses of art, the language used in arts and health, and much more. Further, these archives offer an insight into the working practices and projects of some of the UK’s key arts and health organisations from the 1980s to 1990s. You can find out more about these materials through this article, or through our catalogue by searching the reference ‘ART/’ on our archives and manuscripts search.

The workshop
Our aim is to encourage researchers to uncover the potential of these archives for current or future research projects.

This informal and engaging workshop will allow you to:

  • see and engage with the material,
  • discuss it with our archivists and each other,
  • explore questions and issues which emerge,
  • reflect upon how the material will be relevant to your research,
  • understand the practicalities of accessing and using this material in research.

We are looking for early career researchers to take part in this workshop, especially PhD students and postdoctoral researchers. There are no disciplinary or methodological requirements, and we welcome a diverse set of approaches and backgrounds. If this material is relevant to your work, we’d love to hear from you.

If you would like to participate, please email Aidan (a.peppin@wellcome.ac.uk) with:

  • details of your research interests,
  • your research background,
  • up to 300 words detailing how your research might draw upon this material.

The deadline for enquiries is Sunday 22nd July.

If you are not available on 6th August, please still register your interest to be kept updated on future workshops.

We can provide some support towards travel and accommodation; if your university cannot support your attendance, please get in touch with us.

Feel free to reach out to the above email with any questions. We look forward to hearing from you.

Registration: ‘Curating the Medical Humanities: a one-day workshop’, London

Date: 9.30am-6pm, Thursday 13th September 2018

Location: Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1E 0PD

J.P. Sennitt, St Francis and the Birds. Credit: Adamson Collection / Wellcome Trust.

Curating the Medical Humanities considers some of the key ethical, intellectual and practical challenges involved in curating medical humanities exhibitions, particularly in relation to questions of audience, accessibility, participation and public engagement.

The workshop developed out of the organisers’ experiences curating the exhibition Mr A Moves in Mysterious Ways: Selected Artists from the Adamson Collection, which was shown at the Peltz Gallery in summer 2017. Curating the exhibition raised significant ethical questions about exhibiting materials produced in art therapeutic contexts, particularly in relation to issues of ownership, creative control, the naming of previously anonymous artists/makers, and the categorisation of such works as either art or medical record.

The workshop brings together academics, artists and curators who are engaged in developing and delivering exhibitions relating to experiences of health and the body. Its aim is to share knowledge of these projects and reflect on best practice across the field, through addressing a number of inter-related questions:

  • How do we conceptualise and define the ‘audience/s’ for the work being done in the medical humanities?
  • What constitutes a successful medical humanities exhibition?
  • How can exhibitions utilise notions of co-production, for example by working with constituent communities?
  • How can exhibitions inform or improve experience of health, as opposed to historicizing or critiquing them?
  • What are the reciprocal relationships between curatorial practice and the medical humanities (i.e. how might each challenge conceived ideas or practices)?
  • How useful is the term ‘medical humanities’ to those working outside the academy?

Confirmed participants include Martha Fleming (V&A Research Institute);Sophie Goggins (National Museums Scotland; Natasha McEnroe and Katy Barrett (Science Museum); Lucy Zacaria (Head of Arts, Imperial College Healthcare Trust); Sam Curtis (Bethlem Gallery); Jane Fradgley (artist (http://janefradgley.com); Victoria Tischler (University of West London); Jocelyn Dodd (University of Leicester); and Katherine Ott (National Museum of American History).

This workshop has been organised by Heather Tilley and Fiona Johnstone and is supported by a Wellcome Trust / Birkbeck Conference and Symposia Support Award.

It will take place in the Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1E 0PD.

The provisional programme can be accessed here. Registration is via Eventbrite.

For specific dietary or access requirements, please contact the organisers: h.tilley@bbk.ac.uk or fijohnstone@hotmail.com.

CFP: ‘”The Disease of Caring”: Medical Professionals and Activism from the Nineteenth Century to the Present’, London

Date: Friday 26th October 2018

Location: School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

Supported by the Birkbeck/Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund and the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

Keynote speaker: Dr Anne Hanley (Birkbeck)

In In Darkest London (1891), Margaret Harkness’s popular novel about activism to alleviate poverty conditions in late nineteenth-century London, a doctor practising in a slum neighbourhood speaks of the ‘disease of caring’ that prompts him to give medical care to people in need of much wider social change. Harkness herself had trained as a nurse and pharmacist and her medical knowledge continued to inform her activist work throughout her working life. Both her own career and the fictional doctor in her novel reflect how, as medical care became increasingly professionalised over the course of the nineteenth century, discourses of medicine, social influence, and activism also grew interlinked. From the radical revisions of care provision developed by nurses such as Mary Seacole and Florence Nightingale during and after the Crimean War, to the widening of access to safe and effective birth control by activists from Annie Besant to Marie Stopes, to the founding of the NHS, to protests of junior doctors in the present day, the giving of medical care has often been a radical act, and givers of medical care have often allied themselves with a wide range of activist causes. This one-day symposium will aim to create a dialogue between examples and intentions of medical activists historically and in the present day.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers or poster presentations on medical activism in a broad sense. Papers may wish to address the following topics:

  • Equality of care and access to care
  • Conditions for medical work and care-giving, from field hospitals in the Crimean War to present-day hospital crises
  • Personal recognition within the medical profession, from women’s right to practise to demonstrations and strikes of junior doctors
  • Public health, from sanitation projects in the nineteenth century to obesity in the present day
  • Medical care as activism, from slum doctors in the nineteenth century to Médecins sans frontiers
  • The activism of medical professionals in non-medical fields
  • Patient choice and engagement

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to Flore Janssen at activistmedics@gmail.com by Monday 30th July 2018. If your proposal is for a poster presentation, please indicate this clearly. Please include with your abstract a biographical statement of no more than 100 words.

For more information, visit the Disease of Caring website.

Registration Open: NNMHR Congress, ‘Medical Humanities: Futures’, Leeds

Location: Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds

Date: Thursday 20th – Friday 21st September 2018

The Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research (NNMHR) was founded in 2013 with the purpose of connecting individuals and institutions working in this dynamic area of interdisciplinary research. The network numbers scholars, practitioners, health professionals, artists and health advocates amongst its members and held its first Congress at Durham University in September 2017.

Registration is now open for the second NNMHR Congress, which takes as its theme “Medical Humanities: Futures”. The event will be held at Weetwood Hall at the University of Leeds on Thursday 20 – Friday 21 September 2018. The logic of the Congress is simple: it is an opportunity for people who are passionate or even simply curious about medical humanities research to present their work, share ideas, and meet potential future colleagues and collaborators.

The NNMHR Congress is funded by the Wellcome Trust and is free to attend. Please note that the Congress is not limited to members of the network. All refreshments will be provided, including a Congress dinner on the evening of September 20th. Any questions should be directed to Amelia Defalco at the University of Leeds.

The Congress Hashtag is #NNMHR2018

Registration: ‘Representing Pain: Narrative & Fragments Symposium’, Lancaster

Location: Lancaster University

Date: 9am – 5.30pm, Friday 17th August 2018

This Symposium is part of the AHRC-funded research network Translating Chronic Painwhich is exploring challenges pain experience poses to traditional narrative representation, and the value of rethinking narrativity or embracing unconventional or fragmentary narrative forms. The symposium will explore broad debates around narrativity in medical humanities, the potential of short-form narration or unconventional forms of illness narration, the positivity imperative in illness narration, challenges of chronic pain representation, and the way ‘entanglements’ with fields such as disability studies or trauma theory may enrich critical medical humanities approaches to these questions.

Speakers include Dr Angela Woods (Durham), Dr Stella Bolaki (Kent), Dr James Berger (Yale), Dr Megan Crowley-Matoka (Northwestern), Professor Ann Jurecic (Rutgers), Professor Brendan Stone (Sheffield), and Professor Javier Moscoso (Professor of History and Philosophy of Science, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, Spain).

This Translating Chronic Pain network brings together people living with pain, academics, and pain charities to explore how short-form creative writing may support people living with pain, raise awareness, and enhance healthcare training.

Travel and accommodation bursaries are also available for six postgraduate students or early career researchers.

For more information please visit the project website or email Sara Wasson.

Registration: 25 Years of Madness and Modernism Symposium, Durham

Location: University of Durham

Date: 11th May 2018

Madness and Modernism: Insanity in the Light of Modern Art, Literature and Thought is the magnum opus of the distinguished clinical psychologist and phenomenologist of psychopathology Louis A. Sass. Twenty-five years after its initial publication by Basic Books and then Harvard University Press, a revised edition, published by Oxford University Press in 2017, is introducing new readers to one of the most complex and compelling accounts of the phenomenology of schizophrenia and its reciprocally illuminating relationship with a modernism characterised by paradox and hyperreflexivity, self-consciousness and self-alienation.

A symposium to celebrate, interrogate and reflect upon the significance and wide-ranging influence of Madness and Modernism will be held at Priors Hall, Durham Cathedral on Friday 11 May 2018, 10.15 – 6pm. It features the following presentations:

  • Åsa Jansson (University of Durham) Melancholic Delusions and Modern Madness
  • Joel Krueger (Exeter University) Sass, Schizophrenia, and the Scaffolded Self
  • Elizabeth Barry (Warwick University) Beckett, Sass and Schizophrenia: The Assault on Ipseity
  • Matt ffytche (University of Essex) Reviewing Madness and Modernism through the lens of Outsider Writing
  • Louis Sass (Rutgers University) in conversation with Patricia Waugh (University of Durham)

The symposium is free to attend but places are limited and registration is essential here. Refreshments will be provided throughout the day, which concludes with an informal wine reception.

Please tweet about this symposium using hashtag #MadnessandModernism.

The symposium, convened by Angela Woods, is jointly hosted by Hearing the Voice and the Centre for Medical Humanities and funded by the Wellcome Trust.

Exhibition: ‘The Heart of the Matter’, Newcastle

Dates: 24th March – 6th May 2018

Location: Newcastle

The Heart of the Matter is an exhibition about to launch in Newcastle upon Tyne at the Great North Museum: Hancock. It brings together art and medicine to reflect on the human heart. The heart can symbolise romantic love and the centre of human emotion, but it is also the engine room of our body and an intricate piece of machinery.

Through artworks inspired by patients with heart conditions, their families and clinicians, the exhibition invites you to discover the extraordinary nature and complexity of this organ.

The Heart of The Matter began with a collaboration between artist Sofie Layton and bioengineer Giovanni Biglino. In 2017, they brought together patients with heart conditions at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, the Bristol Heart Institute and the Adult Congenital & Paediatric Heart Unit of Newcastle’s Freeman Hospital to look at the heart emotionally and metaphorically in workshops with scientists, artists, students, and nurses.

Conversations and stories from these workshops in turn inspired artworks that offer insight into the heart’s beauty, fragility and resilience, using scientific and artistic methods. Medical 3D printing and topographical maps describe cardiovascular anatomy; digital animation responds to medical imaging; and other abstracted stories are given form in printed textiles, sound installations and sculpture.

The Heart of The Matter was conceived by artist Sofie Layton and bioengineer Giovanni Biglino, and developed with health psychologist Jo Wray. The work is produced by Susie Hall (GOSH Arts), Nicky Petto and Anna Ledgard in association with Artsadmin, and is supported by the Wellcome Trust, the Blavatnik Family Foundation, Above&Beyond, Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity and using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England. With thanks to RapidformRCA and 3D Life Print.

Find out more online on the exhibition website.

#heartofthematter

Workshop: ‘Illness and Language’, Oxford

Location: Lecture Theatre, The Richard Doll Building, 11 Old Road Campus, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7LF

Date: 9am – 2pm, 21st March 2018

“Illness and Language”* is a knowledge exchange event funded by Wellcome Trust, designed to promote dialogue between multi-faith chaplains working at Oxford University Hospitals and academics interested in religious themes within medical humanities.

Programme:

9-9:40 Professor Jane Macnaughton ‘Listening to what is not said: intersubjective relations in the clinical consultation’

9:50-10:30 Dr Neil Vickers ‘The Other as a metaphor for the self: stigma and illness’

10:40-11 Coffee

11-11:40 Dr Katherine Southwood ‘Job’s tortured body and the language of divine assault’

11:50-12:30 Dr Louise Lawrence ‘Blind Spots and Metaphors: Refiguring Sightless Characters in the Gospels’

12:30 Lunch

* CPD applied for. To secure your place on this event please email Katherine Southwood.