Lecture: Wendy Kline, ‘Making the Invisible Visible: The Unexpected Entanglements of Psychiatry, Midwifery, and Psychedelics’, Glasgow

Location: University of Strathclyde, Stenhouse Wing, Room 105

Date: 5-6.30pm, Tuesday 10th October 2017

The Centre of the Social History of Health and Healthcare (CSHHH) invites you to their annual lecture, by Wendy Kline (Purdue University), on ‘Making the Invisible Visible: The Unexpected Entanglements of Psychiatry, Midwifery, and Psychedelics’. All are welcome, but please reserve a place by emailing caroline.marley@strath.ac.uk as soon as possible.

Abstract

On November 13, 1956, recently certified Czech psychiatrist Stan Grof swallowed 150 micrograms of LSD as one of the earliest Czech volunteers for a research study. Within a few hours, his entire conception about the human psyche and the role of psychoanalysis was turned upside down. He described being hit by a radiance comparable to a “nuclear explosion” which catapulted him out of his body, expanding his consciousness to “cosmic dimensions.”

The timing was fortuitous, for Grof was in the midst of an existential crisis. Like many psychiatrists in Europe and the U.S. in the 1950s, he was inspired by Freudian analysis. Psychoanalysis was brilliant in theory, he believed, but abysmal in practice. It lacked visible proof of efficacy, a reminder of the profession’s struggle for legitimacy. Over the next fifteen years, Grof set out to provide that proof. He established himself as the world’s foremost researcher of psychedelics, conducting over 2000 psychedelic sessions first at the Maryland Psychiatric Research Institute and then at the Esalen Institute in CA.

In this talk, I draw on the records of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center LSD Training Program Study and the papers of Grof to explore the “unexpected entanglements” between psychiatry, midwifery, and psychedelics.

Grof observed “astounding parallels” between psychedelic experiences and the clinical stages of delivery, believing that the common denominator between the two was the trauma of birth. He proposed a “new cartography of the human psyche” grounded in this observation, calling it the Basic Perinatal Matrices (BPM.) Despite the fact that Psychologist Abraham Maslow declared Grof’s framework “the most important contribution to personality theory in several decades,” its influence has been largely ignored by medical historians.

Biography

Wendy Kline is professor and Dema G. Seelye Chair in the History of Medicine in the Department of History at Purdue University. She is the author of several articles and three books (one forthcoming) that focus on controversies surrounding women’s reproductive health. She received her Ph.D. in history from the University of California, Davis, in 1998.

Her first book, Building a Better Race: Gender, Sexuality, and Eugenics from the Turn of the Century to the Baby Boom (University of California Press, 2001), emphasizes the American eugenic movement’s interaction with popular notions of gender and morality during the first half of the twentieth century. Her second book, Bodies of Knowledge: Sexuality, Reproduction, and Women’s Health in the Second Wave (University of Chicago Press, 2010) reveals the ways in which women challenged, expanded, and reinvented constructions of the female body and particular reproductive health in the late twentieth century. Her current book project, under contract with Oxford University Press, is entitled Coming Home: Medicine, Midwives, and the Transformation of Birth in Late-Twentieth-Century America. Based on interviews and archival records of midwives, doctors, and health organizations, this book will be the first in-depth, historical analysis of the home birth movement in the U.S.

RCPSG Lecture: Pankaj Chandak, ‘Safer Surgery – The Lasting Legacy of Joseph Lister’, Glasgow

Lecture, Pankaj Chandak: ‘Safer Surgery – The Lasting Legacy of Joseph Lister’

Date: 7pm, Thursday 15th June 2017 (refreshments from 6.30pm)

Location: Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow, 232-242 St Vincent Street, Glasgow, G2 5RJ

The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Glasgow is delighted to invite you to their annual Goodall Lecture. The Goodall Lecture this year is inspired by the 150th anniversary of Joseph Lister’s article in the Lancet announcing the arrival of antiseptic surgery – a major breakthrough in medical science. This breakthrough was of course achieved in Glasgow, so it is fitting that the lecture is part of the Glasgow Science Festival 2017.

We’re delighted to welcome Mr Pankaj Chandak, transplant surgeon at Guy’s, St Thomas’ and Great Ormond Street Hospitals, who will deliver the Goodall Lecture. Mr Chandak is passionate about Lister’s achievements and his legacy in surgical safety, linking the innovations of the 1860s with today’s developments in 3-D printing. You can see more of Mr Chandak here – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JKUIvt9DI_Q

Setting the context of Lister’s 1867 article is Mr David Hamilton, transplant surgeon and medical historian, author of the classic text The Healers: a History of Medicine in Scotland.

CPD – This lecture has 2 non-clinical credits.

To book a free ticket please contact library@rcpsg.ac.uk, call 0141 221 6072 or go to rcp.sg/GS2017.

Conference Registration: ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’, Glasgow

Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures

Date: Monday 3rd – Tuesday 4th April 2017

Location: Wolfson Medical Building, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LQ

Organizing Committee:

  • Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow
  • Dr Ross White, Psychological Sciences, University of Liverpool

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
  • Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
  • Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’
  • Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’

The Wellcome Trust-funded conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. Having confirmed the programme of speakers for the event, we are delighted to announce that general registration is open.

Registration:

Registration costs £40 for general admittance, and £15 for students/service users. Ticket price includes attendance at the conference on 3rd-4th April 2017, including lunch and refreshments on both days, and a buffet dinner on Mon 3rd April.To register, and to see our full programme of speakers, please visit our Eventbrite page.

Please email the organisers at arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk if you have any queries.

Stone Lecture: Sally Magnusson on Dementia, Glasgow

Date: 6.30pm-8pm, Tuesday 21st February 2017

Venue: The Kelvin Gallery, Main Building, University of Glasgow

Registration Page: https://www.alumni.gla.ac.uk/NetCommunity/events-and-reunions/2017-stone-lecture

It is our great pleasure to invite you to the 2017 Stone Lecture on Tuesday 21st February, during which broadcaster and writer Sally Magnusson will talk about the challenge of dementia.

She will explore how the experience of looking after her mother Mamie (chronicled in her bestselling memoir Where Memories Go) encouraged her to find ways of persuading society to look differently at dementia, and how her mother’s response to music led to the foundation of the charity Playlist for Life.

About the Stone Lecture
The late Sir Alexander Stone was a prominent member of the Jewish community in Glasgow, and a benefactor to the University. In addition, he endowed lectureships in Bibliophily and Rhetoric.

MHRC Discussion Group: Matthew Smith, ‘History in Action: Social Psychiatry in Contemporary, Political Perspective’, Glasgow

Date: 1-2pm, Wednesday 15th February

Location: Room 418, School of Geographical & Earth Sciences, East Quadrangle, University of Glasgow

All are welcome at this Wednesday’s MHRC discussion group, where Dr Matthew Smith (Strathclyde) will be presenting his work on social psychiatry.

History in Action: Social Psychiatry in Contemporary, Political Perspective’

In this ‘post-truth’ era, it is increasingly important for historians to be assertive about the insights their research can offer to contemporary debates and issues, but determining exactly what ‘lessons’ are relevant and developing the skills to articulate them to the wider world is not easy.  Using my current research on the history of social psychiatry as a case study, my paper will discuss my ongoing attempts to distil conclusions that matter from my research into the history of health and medicine and communicate them to the broader public.

Speaker: Dr Matthew Smith (University of Strathclyde).

CFP: Medical Machines in Antiquity Conference, Glasgow

Location: University of Glasgow

Date: 19th-20th May 2017

The technological capabilities and mechanical achievements of the Greeks and Romans have been the subject of considerable scholarly interest in recent years. Consequently, multi and interdisciplinary collaborative research projects have not only investigated the archaeological remains of devices, such as the Antikythera Mechanism, but also utilised the instructions provided in treatises, such as Hero of Alexandria’s On Automata, to undertake experimental archaeological reconstructions of those for which the remains do not survive and develop working prototypes. The role of machines in ancient medicine, however, has been much less scrutinised. To date, the lion’s share of scholarly attention has focused on medical and surgical instruments rather than medical and surgical machinery. While some mechanical and pneumatic devices such as drills, dilators and syringes – examples of which survive in the archaeological record – have been carefully considered, other more complicated contraptions attested only in literature have been overlooked. In point of fact, the most recent extensive survey of ancient medical equipment, Lawrence Bliquez’s 2015 The Tools of Asclepius: Surgical Instruments in Greek and Roman Times, deliberately excluded them entirely (p. x). Yet medical treatises dating back to the fifth century BCE describe a variety of machinery including, but not limited to, benches, ladders, racks, and chests that assist with the treatment of dislocations and fractures. Despite renewed interest in ancient science and technology, the use of machines in medicine in ancient Greece and Rome remains an understudied area, and it is past time for a reassessment. This two-day workshop will offer an opportunity to reassess the evidence for the use of machines in medicine in ancient Greece and Rome.

Potential areas of investigation include but are not limited to:

  • Medical machines in ancient literature
  • Medical machines in the archaeological record
  • The technical aspects of design, production and usage of medical machines
  • The relationship between medical machines and medical instruments
  • The relationship between medical machines and other types of machine
  • Experimental archaeological reconstruction of medical machines
  • The reception of ancient medical machines in later historical periods

Confirmed speakers:

  • Dr Ian Ruffell (University of Glasgow)
  • Dr Laurence Totelin (Cardiff University)
  • Dr Georgia Petridou (University of Liverpool)

Papers should be of 40 minutes’ length, and should not have been previously published or delivered at a major conference. Please submit your abstract (200-300 words, either Word or PDF format) to Dr Jane Draycott (jane.draycott@glasgow.ac.uk) by 31st January 2017. Please include your name, academic affiliation, and contact details in your email. Successful contributions may be considered for publication in a peer-reviewed conference volume.

Medical Humanities Discussion Group, Glasgow (Semester 2)

The Medical Humanities Research Centre at the University of Glasgow is delighted to announce the programme for our discussion group for semester two. Please see details of the sessions below. The meetings will all take place in Room 418 in the East Quadrangle (directions available on the discussion group webpages), between 1-2pm. Tea/coffee and biscuits will be provided. All are welcome!

Wednesday 18th January

Session 1 – ‘Prostheses in Ancient Greece and Rome’

Speaker: Dr Jane Draycott (University of Glasgow)

This session will discuss Jane’s work to date about prosthesis manufacture and use in Classical Antiquity. 

Wednesday 15th February

Session 2 – History in Action: Social Psychiatry in Contemporary, Political Perspective

Speaker: Dr Matthew Smith (University of Strathclyde)

In this ‘post-truth’ era, it is increasingly important for historians to be assertive about the insights their research can offer to contemporary debates and issues, but determining exactly what ‘lessons’ are relevant and developing the skills to articulate them to the wider world is not easy.  Using my current research on the history of social psychiatry as a case study, my paper will discuss my ongoing attempts to distil conclusions that matter from my research into the history of health and medicine and communicate them to the broader public.

Wednesday 22nd March

Session 3 – “I’ve just got to keep myself together …”: The psycho-social geographies of living and coping with Social Anxiety Disorder’” 

Speaker: Louise Boyle (University of Glasgow)

This talk examines the psycho-social dynamics of living and coping with Social Anxiety Disorder; a condition marked by an intense and persistent fear of social interactions, situations and anticipated others. Drawing on lived accounts of anxious experiences from online interviews, I uncover the ways in which various situations, spaces and temporalities may be or become beneficial or detrimental to experiences of illness, health and wellbeing. By paying attention to the relational and embodied practices of coping and self-care, and the inherent spatialities of such practices, I explore how social anxieties necessitate an on-going formation and maintenance of psychological, social and material boundaries. I examine how processes of self-care and mechanisms of coping enable individuals to (re)order and (re)gain control of their socio-spatial surroundings but also ask to what extent are people further isolated and/or restricted by their attempts to manage and control their anxious experiences.

 

CFP Extended: ‘Other Psychotherapies’ conference, Glasgow

CFP EXTENDED – new deadline FRIDAY 16th SEPTEMBER 2016

Monday 3rd April – Tues 4th April 2017

University of Glasgow

The Wellcome Trust-funded Conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. The Conference Committee invites abstracts of up to 300 words for 20-minute presentations, to be submitted by no later than Friday 16th September 2016.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
  • Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’
  • Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
  • Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’

University of Glasgow Organizing Committee:

  • Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature
  • Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics
  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences
  • Dr Ross White, Mental Health and Wellbeing

Papers should address one or more of the conference’s four themes:

1. Ancient approaches to psychotherapy
This theme seeks to explore ancient and medieval approaches to psychotherapy from the Egyptian and Babylonian world, the Graeco-Roman antiquity, the Chinese and medieval Islamic and Jewish traditions. It aims to foreground various ancient practices used in ‘the cure of the soul’, investigating the extent to which modern psychiatric techniques draw upon such wisdom traditions. Other key goals will be to distinguish diverse conceptions of selfhood required or advanced in psychotherapeutic settings, and to consider the borders between religion, medicine, and philosophy.

2. Geographies of Psychotherapy
We invite papers that wish to examine the development of psychological ideas and practices and their transformative effect over a range of (global) spaces, sites and places. Although not limited to such themes, we encourage critical debates into the uneven development of psychological practices over time and space, the changing spatialities of caring practices, embodied practices of healing, and writing psychotherapeutic geographies.

3. Postcolonial/Indigenous Psychotherapies
The emergence of different, competing schools of Western psychotherapy has been accompanied by rapid development in the capacity to share knowledge globally. Western psychotherapies are juxtaposed with forms of healing based on markedly different epistemic and philosophical underpinnings. This theme considers whether indigenous forms of healing in LMICs can be viewed as de facto psychotherapies. Attention will focus on the dynamics of power in post-colonial contexts and how this has influenced the perceived credibility of western vs indigenous forms of therapeutic/healing interaction.

4. Subcultural Psychotherapies
We invite critical engagement with the propensity to see subcultural participation (bodybuilding, gaming, body modification, BDSM, Goth, Emo, etc.) as cause or predictor of psychopathology. While remaining open to subcultural pathogenesis, we encourage exploration of subculture’s therapeutic/salutogenic dimensions, including the recovery/survivor movement, popular/mass culture, new religious movements, and anomalous experiences such as mediumship and therianthropy.

Abstract submission
Abstracts (.doc, .docx, .rtf) should be emailed to arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk by no later than 31 August 2016 along with a short biography (100 words or less). Abstracts will be considered by the conference organizing committee, and notifications will be communicated by no later than 30 September 2016.

Journal Issue
There will be an opportunity for a selection of papers presented at the conference to be developed into a thematic issue of the international peer-reviewed journal Transcultural Psychiatry (http://tps.sagepub.com/) that will be entitled ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’.

Downloadable call
A .pdf of this call may be downloaded: OtherpsychsCFP.

Contact details

If you have any queries, please contact us at arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk or via Twitter on @otherpsychs.

Post: Special Collections Project Manager (C18th Medical Humanities), Glasgow

The University of Glasgow Library has secured funding from the Wellcome Trust for a project to transcribe the 18th century catalogues of William Hunter’ s library using our new collections management system, EMu, and need a Project Manager. This twelve month grade 6 post will manage the digital humanities /medical humanities project “William Hunter’s Library: a transcription of the early catalogues”. The post holder will have day to day responsibility for producing a digital edition of William Hunter’s original library catalogue using 18th century sources in Special Collections, overseeing the work of a small transcription team and ensuring outcomes are widely disseminated and publicised. This project is funded by Wellcome (Research Resources for Medical Historians).

For more info see http://www22.i-grasp.com/fe/tpl_glasgow01.asp?newms=jj&id=89930&newlang=1

Closing date for applications is 18th September 2016. If you have any questions, please contact Julie Gardham(Senior Librarian and Head of Special Collections).

t: +44 (0)141 330 3791

www.gla.ac.uk/ASC | twitter: @UofGlasgowASC | Julie.Gardham@glasgow.ac.uk

CFP: ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’, Glasgow

Monday 3rd April – Tues 4th April 2017

University of Glasgow

The Wellcome Trust-funded Conference ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’ brings contemporary Western expertise into dialogue with psychotherapeutic approaches from ‘other’ spatially, historically or otherwise ‘distant’ cultures. The Conference Committee invites abstracts of up to 300 words for 20-minute presentations, to be submitted by no later than 31st August 2016.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Dr Chiara Thumiger, Classics and Ancient History, University of Warwick: ‘Therapies of the word in ancient medicine’
  • Dr Jennifer Lea, Geography, University of Exeter: ‘Building “A Mindful Nation”? The use of mindfulness meditation in educational, health and criminal justice settings’
  • Dr Claudia Lang, Institute of Social and Cultural Anthropology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich: ‘Theory and practice in Ayurvedic psychotherapy’
  • Dr Elizabeth Roxburgh, Psychology, University of Northampton: ‘Anomalous experiences and mental health’

University of Glasgow Organizing Committee:

  • Dr Gavin Miller (Chair), Medical Humanities Research Centre/English Literature
  • Dr Sofia Xenofontos, Classics
  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan, Geographical and Earth Sciences
  • Dr Ross White, Mental Health and Wellbeing

Papers should address one or more of the conference’s four themes:

1. Ancient approaches to psychotherapy
This theme seeks to explore ancient and medieval approaches to psychotherapy from the Egyptian and Babylonian world, the Graeco-Roman antiquity, the Chinese and medieval Islamic and Jewish traditions. It aims to foreground various ancient practices used in ‘the cure of the soul’, investigating the extent to which modern psychiatric techniques draw upon such wisdom traditions. Other key goals will be to distinguish diverse conceptions of selfhood required or advanced in psychotherapeutic settings, and to consider the borders between religion, medicine, and philosophy.

2. Geographies of Psychotherapy
We invite papers that wish to examine the development of psychological ideas and practices and their transformative effect over a range of (global) spaces, sites and places. Although not limited to such themes, we encourage critical debates into the uneven development of psychological practices over time and space, the changing spatialities of caring practices, embodied practices of healing, and writing psychotherapeutic geographies.

3. Postcolonial/Indigenous Psychotherapies
The emergence of different, competing schools of Western psychotherapy has been accompanied by rapid development in the capacity to share knowledge globally. Western psychotherapies are juxtaposed with forms of healing based on markedly different epistemic and philosophical underpinnings. This theme considers whether indigenous forms of healing in LMICs can be viewed as de facto psychotherapies. Attention will focus on the dynamics of power in post-colonial contexts and how this has influenced the perceived credibility of western vs indigenous forms of therapeutic/healing interaction.

4. Subcultural Psychotherapies
We invite critical engagement with the propensity to see subcultural participation (bodybuilding, gaming, body modification, BDSM, Goth, Emo, etc.) as cause or predictor of psychopathology. While remaining open to subcultural pathogenesis, we encourage exploration of subculture’s therapeutic/salutogenic dimensions, including the recovery/survivor movement, popular/mass culture, new religious movements, and anomalous experiences such as mediumship and therianthropy.

Abstract submission
Abstracts (.doc, .docx, .rtf) should be emailed to arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk by no later than 31 August 2016 along with a short biography (100 words or less). Abstracts will be considered by the conference organizing committee, and notifications will be communicated by no later than 30 September 2016.

Journal Issue
There will be an opportunity for a selection of papers presented at the conference to be developed into a thematic issue of the international peer-reviewed journal Transcultural Psychiatry (http://tps.sagepub.com/) that will be entitled ‘Other Psychotherapies – across time, space, and cultures’.

Downloadable call
A .pdf of this call may be downloaded: OtherpsychsCFP.

Contact details

If you have any queries, please contact us at arts-otherpsychs@glasgow.ac.uk or via Twitter on @otherpsychs.