Registration Open: ‘LHIVES: Narratives of HIV’, Manchester

Date: 4-7pm, Friday November 9th 2018

Location: Friends’ Meeting House, 6 Mount St, Manchester M2 5NS

You can now register for free for the LHIVES: Narratives of HIV event in November 9, 4-7pm in Manchester city centre. Tickets are running out fast. Snacks and drinks will be provided. Register at https://www.bugchasingproject.org/lhives.

This event will discuss the role of stigma and diversity in people’s experiences of HIV through a multidisciplinary approach combining media studies, psychology, philosophy, sociology and nursing. The event will launch with a workshop run by the George House Trust, where an expert in HIV and a person living with HIV will talk about their experiences and answer questions from the public. Then, we will have a roundtable with the following speakers:

  • Rusi Jaspal (Professor of Psychology and Sexual Health, De Montfort University),
  • Brian Heaphy (Professor of Sociology, University of Manchester),
  • Jamie Hakim (Lecturer in Media Studies, East Anglia University),
  • Phil Hutchinson (Lecturer in Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University) and
  • Michelle Croston (Nursing, Manchester Metropolitan University).

After the roundtable, there will be an exhibition of photographs taken as part of Angelia Cabeza’s research for there PhD at the University of Manchester. Free refreshments and cakes will be available.

Event funded by the ESRC and Department of Sociology at The University of Manchester. For any questions, email jaime.garciaiglesias@manchester.ac.uk

Workshop: ‘Connecting or Excluding? New Technologies & Connected Communities’, Glasgow

Date: 2-8pm, Wednesday 26th September

Location: The Lighthouse (Conference Suite), 11 Mitchell Lane, Glasgow, G1 3NU
www.thelighthouse.co.uk

Date: 9.30am-6pm, Thursday 27th September

Location: St Luke’s (Main Hall), 17 Bain Street, Glasgow, G40 2JZ
www.stlukesglasgow.com

This free event will explore how digital technologies and infrastructure help enable innovative co-creation and co-research with communities and can build new communities of learning, shared knowledge and creativity.

The event contributors include researchers, community groups and representatives, artists, and commercial partners who have worked with the Digital Transformations and/or Connected Communities Themes over the course of their development.

The two-day event will include a range of activities including talks, presentations, workshops, performances, networking and exhibition elements.

 

Wednesday 26th September:

 Keynote speakers:

  • Helen Manchester (University of Bristol)
  • Giovanna Fassetta & Esa Aldeghei (University of Glasgow)

The Roundtable Session:

How do we use the digital to support new forms of collaboration and co-creation and to create more inclusive forums of knowledge production?

Speakers will include: Keri Facer (University of Bristol); Jon Rogers (Mozilla Foundation); Richard Clay (Newcastle University);Ming Lim (University of Liverpool Management School).

Screening:

Short screening of films created by Michele Aaron and Bryony Campbell as part of the AHRC-funded Life:Moving project, a collaboration between researchers at the University of Birmingham and the John Taylor Hospice.

Book Series Launch:

The Connected Communities Theme will launch the Foundation Series, 8 reviews exploring the different theoretical and methodological foundations of collaborative research. The reviews will be available to view at the event and download online afterwards.

 

Thursday 27th September:

Decolonising the Digital:

How far and in what ways is our digital world reinforcing existing elites and hierarchies? How far is it a potential vehicle for change and resistance?

Speakers will include: Natalia Cecire (University of Sussex);Nelson Mundell (University of Glasgow); Tim Hitchcock (University of Sussex).

Disability, Illness & the Digital:

How can digital environments help us to reconceptualise disability, illness and accessibility? How can processes of co-creation prioritise the experiences and insights of people with illnesses and/or disabilities?

Speakers will include: Michele Aaron (University of Warwick); Martin Levinson (Bath Spa University); Jayne Wallace (Northumbria University).

Community Connectivities:

How can digital environments promote co-creation and collaborative methods in research and what represents best practice? What have we learnt from trying to build connected communities?

Speakers will include: Hannah Wright (Glasgow Women’s Library);Chiara Bonacchi (University of Stirling); Mike Wilson (Loughborough University).

Archives:

How are digital environments fostering the re-evaluation of the nature of the archive and encouraging different communities to create new types of archive? How can creating archives challenge existing power structures and enhance community identity?

Speakers will include: Rebecca Kahn (Alexander von Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society); Simon Popple (University of Leeds); Niamh Moore (University of Edinburgh)

Attendance is free, but places are limited – please register via the Eventbrite page.

If you have any queries email the team at: digitaltransformationstheme@gmail.com

 

“Going to the Dogs”?: A Workshop Series on Research at the Intersection of Disability and Animal Studies, Leeds

Date: 10am-4pm, Friday 13th April 2018

Location: Centre for Medical Humanities at the University of Leeds (School of English, 6­­–10 Cavendish Road)

Workshop No. 2

Following the success of the first “Going to the Dogs” event on 19 February 2018 (find out more here and discussion stemming from the event here), the Centre for Medical Humanities at the University of Leeds (School of English, 6­­–10 Cavendish Road) will be hosting a follow-up workshop on Friday 13 April 2018 from 10am to 4pm.

This second workshop will feature the following talks:

  • Rachael Gillibrand (Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds), TBC;
  • Ryan Sweet (School of English and Leeds Humanities Research Institute, University of Leeds), “Wooden-Limbed Livestock and Prostheticised Pets: Prostheses for Animals in the Nineteenth-Century Periodical Press”;
  • Neil Pemberton (Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine, University of Manchester), “Stroking with Words: Caress and the Making of Guide-Dog-Human Partnership in 1930s America”;
  • Andy Flack (Department of History, University of Bristol), “Why Look at Animals’ Eyes?: Historicising Understandings of Extra-Visual Perception among Nocturnal Animals”;
  • Justyna Włodarczyk (Department of American Literature, University of Warsaw), “Dogs at Work or Scam Alert? The Cultural and Social Context of the Controversy over Emotional Support Animals in the US”.

If you would like to register for FREE, please email the event organiser, Ryan Sweet (R.C.Sweet@leeds.ac.uk). When writing to Ryan, please inform him of any accessibility needs that you have so that he can ensure that the event is fully inclusive.

Tea, coffee, lunch, and other refreshments will be provided.

Also associated: 

Animals in Disability Art

An evening with Jenni-Juulia Wallinheimo-Heimonen

Related to the “Going to the Dogs” workshop series, from 7pm to 9pm on Thursday 12 April 2018 the Finnish conceptual and textile artist Jenni-Juulia Wallinheimo-Heimonen will be performing, presenting, and explaining her recent disability art that incorporates animals at TheTetley.
To find out more and to register (again for FREE), please visit the Eventbrite page.
If you have any questions, please write to Ryan Sweet (R.C.Sweet@leeds.ac.uk).

Exhibition: ‘The Heart of the Matter’, Newcastle

Dates: 24th March – 6th May 2018

Location: Newcastle

The Heart of the Matter is an exhibition about to launch in Newcastle upon Tyne at the Great North Museum: Hancock. It brings together art and medicine to reflect on the human heart. The heart can symbolise romantic love and the centre of human emotion, but it is also the engine room of our body and an intricate piece of machinery.

Through artworks inspired by patients with heart conditions, their families and clinicians, the exhibition invites you to discover the extraordinary nature and complexity of this organ.

The Heart of The Matter began with a collaboration between artist Sofie Layton and bioengineer Giovanni Biglino. In 2017, they brought together patients with heart conditions at Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, the Bristol Heart Institute and the Adult Congenital & Paediatric Heart Unit of Newcastle’s Freeman Hospital to look at the heart emotionally and metaphorically in workshops with scientists, artists, students, and nurses.

Conversations and stories from these workshops in turn inspired artworks that offer insight into the heart’s beauty, fragility and resilience, using scientific and artistic methods. Medical 3D printing and topographical maps describe cardiovascular anatomy; digital animation responds to medical imaging; and other abstracted stories are given form in printed textiles, sound installations and sculpture.

The Heart of The Matter was conceived by artist Sofie Layton and bioengineer Giovanni Biglino, and developed with health psychologist Jo Wray. The work is produced by Susie Hall (GOSH Arts), Nicky Petto and Anna Ledgard in association with Artsadmin, and is supported by the Wellcome Trust, the Blavatnik Family Foundation, Above&Beyond, Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity and using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England. With thanks to RapidformRCA and 3D Life Print.

Find out more online on the exhibition website.

#heartofthematter

Arts of Breath – series of lecture-performances organised by Life of Breath project, Durham

The Life of Breath Project is pleased to announce ‘Arts of Breath’, a series of lecture-performances exploring the role of breath in poetry, fiction, singing, dance and visual art. All events will take place in Durham. For more information see individual event pages below, or contact Sarah McLusky.

All events are free and everyone is welcome. Most are 6.15pm in ER142, Elvet Riverside, New Elvet, Durham (except *)

The programme launches on Wed 15 November with Prof David Fuller examining Charles Olson’s breath-related theories of poetic structure and how these ideas were taken up by other poets, including William Carlos Williams. To celebrate the launch, this first event will be followed by a drinks reception, which all attendees are welcome to attend.

The featured image is a detail from ‘The Birth of Venus’ by Sandro Botticelli 

Exhibition: ‘Phantom Limb’, Liverpool, 9 July – 3 December 2016

Phantom Limb is an interactive exhibition focusing on medicine, memory and the treatment process. It features around twenty works by nine artists, most of whom work from their own personal experiences of operations and illnesses.

The exhibition is a partnership project between award-winning artist, Euan Gray, and Dr Daniel Whistler, from Liverpool University’s Centre for Health, Arts and Science.

The exhibition highlights medicine and the psychological impact of the treatment process. In particular, it explores how memory physically and mentally affects illness, how pain impacts on memory and cognitive functioning and how memory impacts on pain physically (e.g. phantom pain) and mentally through trauma. It also considers the effect memory has on mental illness.

The exhibition is being held at the University of Liverpool Victoria Gallery and Museum. It features as part of theLiverpool Biennial 2016 Fringe.