CFP: ‘Cultures of Toxicity’, Warwick

Location: University of Warwick

Date: Fri 8th – Say 9th November 2019

Deadline for abstracts: 31st March 2019

In Todd Haynes’ 1995 film Safe, Carol (Julianne Moore) is plagued by ‘multiple chemical sensitivities’. The character experiences her environment as a series of toxic threats that cause accumulating and varied physical and psychical consequences. The film concludes with Carol holed up, alone, in an antiseptic pod in a therapeutic community in the desert. She will be safe here, as long as she remains insulated against the ever-increasing threats of the contemporary world. Thus, it is only through a radically diminished life of social and cultural isolation that Carol can survive and be ‘well’. Safe, then, raises a series of questions about the nature and value of toxicity, vulnerability, safety, and resilience that have become culturally central in the twenty-first century.

This conference aims to explore the concept of toxicity in relation to a number of contemporary political concerns including culture, health, economics, gender, and ecology. We are concerned to examine how cultural practices (from theatre to graphic fiction) and critical methodologies, for example in performance studies, are contributing to, and intervening in, contemporary anxieties about safety, risk and toxicity.

This conference brings together a number of distinct but interlocking ideas. There is a striking contemporary habit to identify phenomena as toxic – from masculinity to assets, from cultures to environments. In this way, ‘toxic’ no longer simply refers to specific physical substances but rather to practices, attitudes, structures and more. Such practices serve to constitute people as multiply helpless, liable to plural risks and dangers. Discourses in health and wellbeing movements, for example, frequently reinforce images of people as vulnerable and promote forms of individualised self-governance and vigilance that obscure real social and political processes. Related, in the global north, we are living through a period of renewed debates about freedom of speech, trigger warnings, and safe spaces on campuses and beyond, all of which tacitly frame art and ideas as potential threats. In this regard, contemporary individuality involves becoming a watchful and resilient guard of one’s sovereign bodily security against infinite and immaterial dangers. Toxicity is, then, both concrete and atmospheric.

What is at stake in such images, narratives, and metaphors of toxicity? How far does describing something like masculinity as ‘toxic’ efface questions of ethics, power, patriarchy and reinscribe womanhood (and other marginalised categories of identity) as inevitably vulnerable? To what degree does toxicity reproduce attitudes to identity and history that are both individualising and fatalistic? In what ways does the notion of ‘safety’ operate as a means to neutralise political complaint or resistance? Or might the language of toxicity be politically generative, insisting on the real-world effects of patterns of behaviour, structures of economic speculation and disparate practices of environmental depletion? Does toxicity expose faultlines in cultural norms, understandings, and values? Put simply, what does toxicity mean and what does it do?How is toxicity produced, sustained, and distributed? The conference thus seeks to examine what lies beneath labels of toxicity and interrogate the complex politics of threat, vulnerability, safety, and resistance.

We invite papers of 20 minutes that respond to notions of cultures of toxicity in relation to a wide range of areas including:

  • Arts, culture, and performance
  • Gender and sexuality
  • Health and wellbeing
  • Education and pedagogy
  • Environments and ecologies
  • Structures and systems
  • Government and policy
  • Political organisation and expression
  • Economics and finance
  • Communities and cultures

The conference will take place at the University of Warwick on Friday 8th and Saturday 9th November 2019 and will include a keynote paper from Professor Frank Furedi.  We would like to receive abstracts of no more than 300 words with an accompanying biog of up to 150 words by 31st March 2019. Please send your abstract and any questions to a.r.harpin@warwick.ac.uk and d.rebellato@rhul.ac.uk

CFP: ‘New Directions in Critical Disability Studies Postgraduate Symposium’, Sheffield

Date: 10am – 4pm, 9th July 2019

Location: Workroom 4, on the first floor of 38 Mappin Street, University of Sheffield, S1 4DT

This one-day symposium invites postgraduate researchers to engage with some of these questions as they relate to their own research projects. The day offers the exciting possibility of learning with and from one another to think about the different directions that are now being taken within critical disability studies. Each speaker will offer a unique contribution to the day, drawing upon the theoretical and methodological frameworks of their PhD project. The call for papers is intentionally broad in order to provide an open and flexible space for these new directions to be debated and discussed. While broad, presenters are brought together through their interest in both developing, and initiating, new directions in critical disability studies. We hope to meet with postgraduate researchers from a range of institutions and seek to explore the following questions:

What does it mean to be human?

What does it mean to be pushed to the peripheries of its borders?

How might we confront these borders and rethink the dominant territory of the ‘normal’ human?

How, as a collective of postgraduate researchers, can we have honest and open conversations about what the human is, isn’t, and could be?

We welcome proposals from postgraduate researchers who position their work within the field of CDS. We are interested in exploring some of the new directions you are taking this field within the unique parameters of your PhD topic. Abstracts should be between 150 and 200 words.

Please send your abstract, and brief bio, to newdirectionscds@gmail.com on or before Wednesday 13th March, 2019. We aim to respond to you by Monday 15th April with our decisions.

The symposium will take place in Workroom 4, on the first floor of 38 Mappin Street, University of Sheffield, S1 4DT. This space has access to accessible toilet facilities, gender-neutral toilets, car-parking, and with level access into the building. The building does not play background music. Lift access is available next to workroom 4.

More info on accessibility has been created by Disabled Go https://www.accessable.co.uk/venues/38-mappin-street

An interactive map of the building is available following this link http://ssid.sheffield.ac.uk/38-mappin-floor-plan/

This is a free event and lunch and light refreshments will be provided.

If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with us newdirectionscds@gmail.com

More information can be found here.

#NDCDS

CFP: ‘Chronicity and Crisis: Time in the Medical Humanities’, Montclair NJ

Location: Montclair State University, New Jersey, USA

Date: 26th – 27th October 2019

An International Conference co-sponsored by the Montclair State University Medical Humanities Program and the Waiting Times Research Group (a Wellcome Trust funded research project based at the Universities of Exeter and Birbeck, London, UK)

Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Mark Solms   Chair, Neuropsychology, University of Cape Town & Groote Schuur Hospital  
Title: “A Man Who Got Lost in Time:  Feeling and Uncertainty in the Face of Oblivion”

Dr. Rishi Goyal   Director, Medicine, Literature and Society Program, Columbia University
Title: “Crisis, Catastrophe and Emergency: Disentangling Temporal Patterns of Care and Response”

Those with interests in general practice, psychotherapy, disability studies, palliative care, end-of-life care, narrative medicine, public health, medical anthropology, medical history, literature and medicine and body studies, and researchers addressing questions of care and temporality within fields such as philosophy, sociology, psychology, critical and cultural studies, gender studies and Black studies are most welcome.

Possible paper and panel topics include:

  • waiting time
  • access and discrimination
  • trauma and urgency
  • suspense and disease in mass media
  • representations of chronic illnesses in art, literature, and film
  • narrative time in medical fiction and nonfiction
  • theories of crisis and chronicity
  • theories of rupture and endurance
  • the temporalities of psychic life

Abstract submissions to be sent to Dr. Jefferson Gatrall by 1st April 2019, at gatrallj@montclair.edu

Organizing committee:

CFP: Research Symposium on Global Genetic Fictions, Leeds

Date: 25th-26th April 2019

Deadline for abstracts: Friday 21st December 2018

Location: Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds

CFP: Research Symposium, Global Genetic Fictions, Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds, 25-26 April 2019

As genetic science develops at breakneck speed, cultural representations register in their form and content changing ideas about the self and personhood, consciousness, behaviour and motivation, heredity, and the boundaries of the human body. And yet, ‘western’ science is only one of a number of frameworks that provide explanations for these phenomena. Knowledge, assumptions and beliefs about what a gene is and what the human genome is, about inheritance, kinship, who owns the body, its parts and ‘data’, are not universal but are culturally produced, culturally interpreted, and culturally situated. For many indigenous communities, for instance, genes may be understood as ‘the ancestors within’ (Grace 1998), a perspective generating different philosophical questions from those raised by ‘western’ scientific frameworks about the make-up of the self and different ethical priorities regarding genetic research.
In this symposium we seek to bring together two recent currents in contemporary biocultural scholarship: a) critical engagement with the representation of ideas from genetic science in media and cultural texts; and b) the development of postcolonial approaches to biomedicine and the life sciences, which interrogate the cultural biases and structural inequalities inherent in these fields. We shall explore the representation of genetic discourse in literature, film, news media, popular culture and philosophy across cultures, and will pay particular attention to representations from the global South.

Confirmed speakers: Prof. Jay Clayton, Vanderbilt; Prof. Clare Hanson, Southampton; Dr Josie Gill, Bristol; Dr Shital Pravinchandra, QMUL; Dr Jerome De Groot, Manchester; Dr Jenny Bangham, Cambridge; Dr Lucy Burke, Manchester Met; Dr Lara Choksey, Exeter.

Topics for consideration may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • How creative works from around the world engage with scientific concepts of the gene, genomics, epigenetics, as well as related ideas including human variation, inheritance and ancestry;
  • How genes, the human genome, heredity, and ownership of genetic information are conceptualised across different cultural frameworks;
  • How cultural texts are both influenced by, and help to shape understandings of, genetic science;
  • How cultural texts negotiate questions of identity (including race, disability, gender, sexuality, and species) in relation to genetics;
  • Representations of genetic research, including its methodologies, dissemination, and ethics;
  • Postcolonial/decolonial/indigenous approaches to the legal, ethical, regulatory, and market frameworks of the life sciences;
  • The relationships between genre, form and genetic representations.

We welcome perspectives from disciplines including literary studies, film studies, history, law, media and cultural studies, critical and cultural theory, philosophy, postcolonial studies, critical medical humanities, disability studies, and bioethics. We are also keen to include participation from creative practitioners (writers, filmmakers, visual artists, performance artists) whose work engages with genetic science, and welcome proposals for creative sessions (film screenings, readings, performances, art exhibits).

Please submit 300-word proposals plus a short bio (100 words) to Clare Barker at c.f.barker@leeds.ac.uk. We also have a limited number of spaces for non-speaking participants; if you would like to attend please submit a short description (200 words max) of how the symposium relates to your field of research, creative or professional practice. The closing date for submissions is Friday 21 December 2018.

This symposium is part of a University of Leeds research project on ‘Genetics and Biocolonialism in Contemporary Literature and Film’ and is funded by a Wellcome Trust Seed Award [grant number 106839/Z/15/Z]. Attendance is free and catering will be provided for all delegates. Accommodation and travel expenses will be covered for all invited speakers.

CFP: ‘Experiences of Dis/ability from the Late Middle Ages to the Mid-Twentieth Century’, Tampere, Finland

Date: 22nd – 23rd August 2019

Location: University of Tampere, Finland

Keynote speakers:

  • David Lederer, Maynooth University
  • Donna Trembinski, St. Francis Xavier University
  • David Turner, Swansea University

In recent decades, dis/ability history has become an important field in its own right, standing at the crossroads of the social history of medicine, the history of minorities and the history of everyday life. Conceptions of and attitudes to physical and mental wellbeing and to difference are and have always been key elements in any human society, while the lived experience of dis/ability has varied across societies and time periods, but also depending on the person’s socioeconomic status, age, gender, and the nature of the impairment. Experiences of disability, whether personal or communal, have long continuities in the past, but they have also changed dramatically with the development of medical science and institutionalized care.

This conference aims to concentrate on the experiences of those with physical or mental impairments and chronic illnesses, with special reference to the period between the late Middle Ages and the mid-twentieth century. We understand dis/ability in a broad sense, covering a wide range of physical, mental and intellectual impairments and chronic illnesses. How, then, were various dis/abilities lived and experienced, how did communities shape these experiences, and what similarities and changes can we detect over the course of time? An important viewpoint is also that of methodology: how can a modern scholar approach the experience of those living in the past?

We thus invite papers that explore the ways in which ‘disabilities’ have been lived and experienced, in all stages of life, and by people of different social status and background. The conference aims to promote dialogue between disability historians across national and chronological borders and we welcome papers presenting new research and work in progress.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • How to approach the experience of disability (sources, methodology)?
  • Different categories of disability experience, or what counts as experience of disability?
  • How have society, religion and practices of care and cure defined the experience of disability?
  • Religion and disability
  • Medicalization, institutionalization and everyday life
  • The impact of gender, age and social status on the experience of disability
  • Lived welfare and everyday experiences of people with disabilities, e.g. living at home, in a workhouse or mental institution, the impact of various welfare systems

To submit a proposal, please send title and abstract of 200 words, with your contact information and affiliation by 15th February 2019, at https://www.lyyti.in/disabilityexperience2019_callforpapers

Conference website: https://events.uta.fi/disabilityexperience2019/

Participation is free of charge, and includes lunches and coffees for speakers.

The conference is organized by the Academy of Finland Centre of Excellence in the History of Experiences (HEX, https://research.uta.fi/hex/) at the University of Tampere and the group “Lived Religion” and has received funding from The Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation and HEX. For more information, please write to the organizers (jenni.kuuliala@uta.fi and riikka.miettinen@uta.fi)

 

Symposium Registration: ‘History of Medicine at the University of Glasgow’

Date: 9.30am – 4.30pm, 6th December 2018

Location: Yudowitz Seminar Room, Wolfson Medical Building, University of Glasgow

The Centre for the History of Medicine at the University of Glasgowinvites you to a one-day symposium. The event takes place on 6th December 2018, between 9.30am and 4.30pm in the Yudowitz Seminar Room, in the Wolfson Medical School.

The papers cover three main themes:

  • the history of infection control from the early modern period to the present day
  • law and medicine (nineteenth and twentieth centuries)
  • responses to reproductive health issues (1950 to the present day)

Entry is free, but numbers are limited and registration is required for catering purposes: please register here.

Please email rosemary.elliot@glasgow.ac.uk or angus.ferguson@glasgow.ac.uk to advise of any dietary or other requirements.

Programme: 

09.15 – 09.30 – Registration & coffee

09.30 – 10.30 Introduction and opening talk

  • Dr Angus Ferguson – Welcome
  • Professor Marguerite Dupree – Aspects of the History of Infection Control in British Hospitals since c.1870.

10.30 – 10.45 – Coffee and cake

10.45 – 12.15 Understanding diseases

  • Mona O’Brien – Pox and Poverty: Developments in municipal health care and poor relief in early modern Nuremberg.
  • Frances Osis – Specimen Stories: Finding Venereal Disease in Medical Museums.
  • Dr Hannah-Louise Clark – From Jinn Theory to Germ Theory: Translating Bacteriological Medicine in Colonial Algeria.

12.15 – 13.15 – LUNCH served in the Atrium

13.15 – 14.15 Law and medicine in Scotland (Chair: Dr Angus Ferguson)

  • Dr Cheryl McGeachan & Ross McGregor – A Distinctly Scottish Surgeon? Uncovering Police Surgery in 19th Century Scotland.
  • Dr Jeff Meek – “Lillies, Whitehats and Retired Lawyers”: The Interaction between Law and Medicine in Categorising Homosexual Offenders in Early Twentieth-Century Scotland.

14.15 – 15.45 Responding to reproductive health issues (Chair: Dr Rose Elliot)

  • Vanessa Cook – Analysing silences: accessing men’s emotions towards childlessness during the 1960s and 1970s.
  • Paula Blair – The Genetics of Prenatal Diagnosis, c.1950 – 1990: The Case of Malcolm Ferguson-Smith.
  • Dr Maelle Duchemin-Pelletier – Stillbirth in Britain: the experience of women and their partners, 1980-c.2016.

15.45 – 16.30 – Coffee followed by round-table discussion on the history of medicine at University of Glasgow

CFP: ‘Ageing, Illness, Care in Literary and Cultural Narratives’, Huddersfield

Date: Thurs 5th – Friday 6th September 2019

Location: University of Huddersfield, UK

Keynotes speakers:

  • Sally Chivers, Trent University, Canada
  • Amelia DeFalco, University of Leeds, UK
  • Margaret Morganroth Gullette, Brandeis University, US (by skype)

Stories about ageing, illness and care permeate ageing societies. Although illness and care are not an inevitable part of ageing, ageing, especially advanced ageing, is often associated with greater infirmity and increasing dependence on others. Common media representations evoke the apocalyptic effects of the burden of care as they pit a younger, able-bodied workforce against an ageing and frail population that threatens to bring financial disaster. And, yet, care is part of all of our lives: we live in a web of relations that support embodied life. As many in the field of feminist ethics of care have shown, serious illness and the care it necessitates focuses our attention on the very nature of selfhood and citizenship, as the prized neoliberal values of autonomy, independence and choice are undermined by intimate relationships between selves. Ageing, illness and care generate a complex nexus of affective, social and political relations and interactions that raise ethical questions about self and other.

Literary and cultural narratives negotiate, and help us to explore, this web of interactions and the complex questions about subjectivity that they raise. Reading and writing about ageing, illness and care also encourages us to engage with the challenges that these may pose to individuals and to society. As we do so, we inevitably consider the representational limits and the possibilities of literary and cultural narratives.

This conference welcomes papers that explore the intersections of ageing, illness and care in literary and cultural narratives in English and other languages; including prose fiction, poetry, life writing, comics, film and the media. Papers may engage with fields such as ageing studies, disability studies, queer studies, philosophy and creative writing, but are not limited to these areas of study. The language of the conference is English.

We invite proposals for:

  • 20-minute papers. Abstracts of approximately 300 words should be accompanied by a short biographical note.
  • 10-minute presentations based on a pre-circulated paper to allow for longer and more focused discussion. Abstracts of approximately 300 words should be accompanied by a short biographical note
  • Workshops and panels. Panels should consist of three papers and the proposal should include abstracts for the panel and for each of the papers as well as the email address for correspondence. Workshop organisers should send an abstract outlining the scope and nature of the workshop along with details of all participants and the email for correspondence.

Submissions should be emailed to Katsura Sako and Sarah Falcus at
ageing@hud.ac.uk.

Closing date for submissions: 11th February, 2019. Speakers will be
notified of acceptance by 31 March.

This event is funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
(KAKENHI: Project No. 17KK0030).

CFP: ‘Storytelling for Health 2 International Conference’, Cardiff and Swansea

Date: 27th – 29th June 2019

Location: Cardiff and Swansea, Wales

Closing Date for Proposals: 23.59 GMT on Sunday 18th November 2018

Storytelling for Health 2 International Conference

The organisers are delighted to announce that ABMU Health Board and the University of South Wales are working together with a range of partners towards the next conference ‘Storytelling for Health 2: Patient Stories’, which will take place on 27th, 28th and 29th June 2019. We will be narrowing the focus slightly for this conference to look at how patient experiences are captured, presented and understood through story. We hope this will make for some provocative and productive conversations.

Thursday 27th June will be a student conference hosted by the University of South Wales at the Atrium in Cardiff. Delegates will then go by coach to Swansea to join the first event of the main conference at 7pm on the 27th.

Keynote Performance
We are thrilled that Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver, aka renowned performance company Split Britches, will be bringing a new version of their show ‘the RUFF Story’ as the keynote premiere performance. See https://vimeo.com/98126127 for more details.

The RUFF Story
In the performance of RUFF, Peggy Shaw ruminates on life before and after the stroke she had in 2011 and pays tribute to those who have kept her company over the last 70 years. Peggy says there are dark spots and blanks in her memory now and the performance is a lament for the absence of those who disappeared into the dark holes left behind and a celebration that her brain is able to fill the dark spots with new insight.

The RUFF Story is an unplugged, storytelling version of the original performance, a freewheeling monologue laced with deadpan humour, arresting honesty and some up to the minute reflections on life before, during and since her stroke.

‘A powerful ode to vulnerability’ – Diva Magazine

Performed by Peggy Shaw
Written by Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver

Invited Speakers
As well as Peggy Shaw and Lois Weaver other invited speakers include Pippa Hardy & Tony Summers of Patient Voices http://www.patientvoices.org.uk/ and Susan Ashby & Rachel White from Keele University https://www.keele.ac.uk/nursingandmidwifery/uci/gatheringstories/.

We will also be welcoming speakers from the fields of health, storytelling and policy – keep an eye on the website and social media for the latest news on invited speakers.

Call for Contributions
See more information here
The deadline for submissions is at 23.59 GMT on Sunday November 18th

Booking Information
Book your place now at the early bird rate (full rate from March 1st)
https://storyforhealth2.eventbrite.co.uk
Separate tickets can be purchased for the student event
https://storyforhealth2-student.eventbrite.co.uk/

Please Note
All speakers will be expected to register for the conference. A limited number of bursaries will be available to enable those not funded by organisations or not in receipt of a full time salary to attend. Please contact Prue.Thimbleby@wales.nhs.uk for an application form.

CFP: ‘History of Technology and Disability’, International Committee for the History of Technology conference, Poland

Date: 22nd – 27th July 2019
Location: Katowice, Poland
Date for submissions: 15th December 2018
I am seeking panelists for a session on complexity and history of mutual relations between technology and disability for 2019 International Committee for the History of Technology (ICOHTEC) conference to be held in Katowice, Poland 22-27 July 2019. The panel will engage with the main conference theme (technology and power) by examining the disability-technology relations in local, statewide, and global frameworks. In this panel I hope to explore an entanglement where technology, disability, poverty, gender, and ethnicity intersect – all these aspects influence the accessibility as well as development of instruments, services and “technical literacy”.

Potential topics include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • the bio/medical technologies as biopolitical tool
  • strategies and contexts of resistance against bio/medical technologies
  • prosthesis as cultural artefact and political statement
  • dis/emancipatory technologies
  • global and postcolonial aspects of relations between technology and disability
  • special – mainstream – and back again: assistive technologies
  • the cyborgisation of the disabled body
  • disabled users and DIY practices: reusing, repairing and tinkering as inventing
  • the disabled inventors

To submit a proposal please send it to magda.zdrodowska@uj.edu.pl by 15th December 2018, as the session proposals deadline is 15 January 2019. In your proposal please include a 300-word abstract (please keep that limit as the submission system is very strict), as well as one-page CV, both in .doc or .docx format.

To see the original CfP please visit ICOHTEC’s website.

Magdalena Zdrodowska

Jagiellonian University

CFP: ‘Hearing/non-hearing, technology and art’, Media Art History RE:SOUND conference, Denmark

Date: 20th – 23rd August 2019
Location: Aalborg University, Denmark
Deadline for submissions: 1st November 2018
I am looking for panelists for my session on experiencing hearing and non-hearing in technology and art for 2019 Media Art History RE:SOUND conference, which will be held in Aalborg University (Denmark) on August 20-23, 2019. This session is part of Track 4: Art and Technology: Methodologies, Practices, Histories. More information about the track can be found here.

I propose two paths to explore the hearing/non-hearing theme:

The first one is related to do the physical condition of non-hearing, namely the deafness, such as:

  • past, present and future of sound amplification
  • the impact of deaf-targeted amplifying equipment on mainstream technology (e.g. cybernetics, sound film)
  • the deaf experience of sound and music (e.g. vibrations, amplification)
  • the “translation” of music into signing
  • usage of deaf-targeted instruments in art

The second path relates to deliberate non-hearing, especially in urban public spaces:

  • practices of isolation from unwanted/unpleasant/threatening sounds
  • both everyday and artistic strategies of sound elimination or selection
  • architectural aspects of creating quiet or soundproof rooms and spaces
  • headphones, walkman, ipod… – the tools of sound elimination and selection
  • hearing and non-hearing in different cultural contexts

I warmly invite you to consider addressing above-mentioned themes but – as it is just a partial list of pertinent topics – proposals on other issues related to hearing/non-hearing in technology and art are very welcomed.

Those who consider contributing to this or another thematic session at Media Art History are responsible to submit their abstracts on their own. However, I recommend you to contact me first at magda.zdrodowska@uj.edu.pl.

To learn more about the conference in general or about other featured session, please go to http://www.mediaarthistory.org/resound-maincall. On the top of the page there is a link to the conference registration system. Proposals should consist of a 300-word abstract and a short bio. All proposals will undergo a double blind review by the Program Committee. The deadline for submitting the abstract submission is 1st November, but in in case you need more time, please let me know.

The International Conference on the Histories of Media Art, Science and Technology – RE:SOUND is hosted by RELATE (Research Laboratory for Art and Technology), Aalborg University and will be held August 20-23, 2019 in partnership with the STRUER Sound Art Festival and CATCH – Center for Art & Tech in Elsinor.

Magdalena Zdrodowska
Jagiellonian University, Poland