CFP: ‘New Directions in Critical Disability Studies Postgraduate Symposium’, Sheffield

Date: 10am – 4pm, 9th July 2019

Location: Workroom 4, on the first floor of 38 Mappin Street, University of Sheffield, S1 4DT

This one-day symposium invites postgraduate researchers to engage with some of these questions as they relate to their own research projects. The day offers the exciting possibility of learning with and from one another to think about the different directions that are now being taken within critical disability studies. Each speaker will offer a unique contribution to the day, drawing upon the theoretical and methodological frameworks of their PhD project. The call for papers is intentionally broad in order to provide an open and flexible space for these new directions to be debated and discussed. While broad, presenters are brought together through their interest in both developing, and initiating, new directions in critical disability studies. We hope to meet with postgraduate researchers from a range of institutions and seek to explore the following questions:

What does it mean to be human?

What does it mean to be pushed to the peripheries of its borders?

How might we confront these borders and rethink the dominant territory of the ‘normal’ human?

How, as a collective of postgraduate researchers, can we have honest and open conversations about what the human is, isn’t, and could be?

We welcome proposals from postgraduate researchers who position their work within the field of CDS. We are interested in exploring some of the new directions you are taking this field within the unique parameters of your PhD topic. Abstracts should be between 150 and 200 words.

Please send your abstract, and brief bio, to newdirectionscds@gmail.com on or before Wednesday 13th March, 2019. We aim to respond to you by Monday 15th April with our decisions.

The symposium will take place in Workroom 4, on the first floor of 38 Mappin Street, University of Sheffield, S1 4DT. This space has access to accessible toilet facilities, gender-neutral toilets, car-parking, and with level access into the building. The building does not play background music. Lift access is available next to workroom 4.

More info on accessibility has been created by Disabled Go https://www.accessable.co.uk/venues/38-mappin-street

An interactive map of the building is available following this link http://ssid.sheffield.ac.uk/38-mappin-floor-plan/

This is a free event and lunch and light refreshments will be provided.

If you have any questions, please feel free to get in touch with us newdirectionscds@gmail.com

More information can be found here.

#NDCDS

CFP: Special Issue of C21, ‘Surveilling the Body: Ableism and Anglophone Literature’

C21 Call for Papers

Special Issue: “Surveilling the Body: Ableism and Anglophone Literature”

Guest edited by Dr Susan Flynn and Dr Antonia Mackay

Deadline for articles: 1st May 2019

Surveillance Studies has made a substantial contribution to interrogations of human rights offences by helping to document instances of discrimination in recent times. Indeed, examinations of the ‘culture’ of surveillance have been useful in examining the myriad occasions of human rights offences in issues such as race (Browne 2012; Flynn and Mackay 2018), yet surveillance practices via literature, especially those associated with the discourse of ableism, have been largely ignored. This special issue aims to initiate new discussions of ableism in the discourses of surveillance through literature and engage with the issues of the non-normate body, particularly as surveillance uses the normalizing technologies of power to monitor, control and regulate behaviours and mobilities of certain bodies.

In contemporary literature, the forms of agency and subjectivity available to those who are outside the hegemonic ‘norm’ are often limited; literature is most often written with a mainstream readership in mind and thus can be read as deeply ‘ableist’. Interrogating instances of ableism in characterisation and in narrative arcs calls for an examination of how (unearned) privilege attaches to those who can conform to the supposed norm. Such a lens interrogates the status quo as opposed to seeking the ‘inclusion’ of persons with disabilities within extant social structures. This special issue is particularly concerned with twenty-first century writing and its complex relationship both with surveillance and with representations of disability. We are aware of the tendency for dominant groups to project their own experiences as representative of all humanity thereby excluding other groups – we hope to preclude this by providing a broad range of readings and approaches from a diverse authorship. We are interested in readings of new texts which engage with the surveillance of disability or with radical readings of texts dealing with either intellectual, physical or acquired disability.

Papers might include topics such as:

  • The role of surveillance in (dis)abling bodies in contemporary fiction, poetry, short stories and drama
  • The complexity of the representation of the corporeal body in Twenty-First Century Anglophone writings
  • The manner in which surveillance can affect the marginalisation of groups of peoples in Anglophone literary discourse
  • The hypervisibility of the body with disability in poetry, drama and written narratives
  • Representations of surveilled spaces which impact upon the able and disabled characterisation of identity from within contemporary settings
  • Consideration of how the lens contributes to definitions of types of bodies in Anglophone writings
  • Hypertextual readings of contemporary literature which contribute to the enabling of otherwise marginalised bodily movement through narratoglical means
  • The impact of gender/race/sexuality on surveilling the body
  • The implications of ableist forms of surveillance in literature in our contemporary political climate
  • Digital storytelling and the visibility of disability rights and culture
  • Digital platforms as a means to re-vision the body with disability

Articles of 6000 – 8000 words along with a short bio (150 words) should be sent to Dr Susan Flynn (s.flynn@lcc.arts.ac.uk) and Dr Antonia Mackay (antoniamackay@brookes.ac.uk) by 1st May 2019.

CFP: Special Issue of JLCDS, ‘Learning Difficulties: Histories and Cultures’

Journal of Literary and Cultural Disability Studies

Special issue: Learning Difficulties: Histories and Cultures

Guest editors: Owen Barden and Tina Cook

Deadline for abstracts: 5th April 2019

Until the late 20th century, intellectual disability history was subsumed or neglected within accounts from the psycho-medical professions, educational and mental health services, sociologists, and historians. More recently, input from a broad range of disciplines has helped to challenge the assumed truths generated about learning difficulties generated by medics, scientists, and medical historians.  Learning difficulties have also emerged as a field of inquiry in their own right within disability studies, following recognition that this aspect of disability has frequently been overlooked in both the initial turn to the social model and the subsequent re-turn to impairment. The overall objective of this special issue will be to make a significant contribution to this growing field of interdisciplinary and emancipatory research about learning difficulties.

Disabled people generally, and people labelled with learning difficulties specifically, have often been excluded not only from research but from culture and history more broadly. This has made people labelled with learning difficulties almost invisible. Where representations do exist, they are often skewed by the label and tropes of learning difficulties. We seek contributions evidencing the generation of new knowledge about learning difficulties and their histories, and which bring a variety of perspectives to bear not only on historical material and accounts, but also on the lived experience of learning difficulties today. 

We encourage histories which foreground the role of culture, and the impact people labelled with learning disabilities have had on culture, rather than medicalized accounts. A cultural approach to history addresses the discursive practices and formations surrounding learning difficulties; it is concerned with the way people said to have learning difficulties are conceptualized, spoken about, and interacted with, and with the relational and environmental factors contextualizing and shaping these practices and formations. We welcome both histories of lives of people labelled with learning difficulties and historical analyses of cultural representations of learning difficulties.

Possible topics might include:

  • Representations of learning difficulties in historico-cultural artefacts.
  • Explorations of identity and intersectionality in relation to learning difficulties.
  • Analyses of the cultural work done by the organizing concept of learning difficulties.
  • Cultural histories, including ‘histories of the present’, which reveal important yet hidden aspects of contemporary experience.
  • Local, personal and insider histories, knowledges and perspectives.

Timetable:

5th April 2019: submission of a 500-word proposal for articles or a 150-word proposal for reviews and a short bio to the guest editors Owen Barden bardeno@hope.ac.uk and Tina Cook cookt@hope.ac.uk.

3rd May 2019: prospective authors notified of proposal status.

30th Nov 2020: Full versions of selected papers due to editors.

May 2020: Finalists selected.  Decisions and revisions on submissions sent to authors.

August 2020: Final revised papers due.

CFP: ‘Chronicity and Crisis: Time in the Medical Humanities’, Montclair NJ

Location: Montclair State University, New Jersey, USA

Date: 26th – 27th October 2019

An International Conference co-sponsored by the Montclair State University Medical Humanities Program and the Waiting Times Research Group (a Wellcome Trust funded research project based at the Universities of Exeter and Birbeck, London, UK)

Keynote Speakers:

Dr. Mark Solms   Chair, Neuropsychology, University of Cape Town & Groote Schuur Hospital  
Title: “A Man Who Got Lost in Time:  Feeling and Uncertainty in the Face of Oblivion”

Dr. Rishi Goyal   Director, Medicine, Literature and Society Program, Columbia University
Title: “Crisis, Catastrophe and Emergency: Disentangling Temporal Patterns of Care and Response”

Those with interests in general practice, psychotherapy, disability studies, palliative care, end-of-life care, narrative medicine, public health, medical anthropology, medical history, literature and medicine and body studies, and researchers addressing questions of care and temporality within fields such as philosophy, sociology, psychology, critical and cultural studies, gender studies and Black studies are most welcome.

Possible paper and panel topics include:

  • waiting time
  • access and discrimination
  • trauma and urgency
  • suspense and disease in mass media
  • representations of chronic illnesses in art, literature, and film
  • narrative time in medical fiction and nonfiction
  • theories of crisis and chronicity
  • theories of rupture and endurance
  • the temporalities of psychic life

Abstract submissions to be sent to Dr. Jefferson Gatrall by 1st April 2019, at gatrallj@montclair.edu

Organizing committee:

CFP: Research Symposium on Global Genetic Fictions, Leeds

Date: 25th-26th April 2019

Deadline for abstracts: Friday 21st December 2018

Location: Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds

CFP: Research Symposium, Global Genetic Fictions, Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds, 25-26 April 2019

As genetic science develops at breakneck speed, cultural representations register in their form and content changing ideas about the self and personhood, consciousness, behaviour and motivation, heredity, and the boundaries of the human body. And yet, ‘western’ science is only one of a number of frameworks that provide explanations for these phenomena. Knowledge, assumptions and beliefs about what a gene is and what the human genome is, about inheritance, kinship, who owns the body, its parts and ‘data’, are not universal but are culturally produced, culturally interpreted, and culturally situated. For many indigenous communities, for instance, genes may be understood as ‘the ancestors within’ (Grace 1998), a perspective generating different philosophical questions from those raised by ‘western’ scientific frameworks about the make-up of the self and different ethical priorities regarding genetic research.
In this symposium we seek to bring together two recent currents in contemporary biocultural scholarship: a) critical engagement with the representation of ideas from genetic science in media and cultural texts; and b) the development of postcolonial approaches to biomedicine and the life sciences, which interrogate the cultural biases and structural inequalities inherent in these fields. We shall explore the representation of genetic discourse in literature, film, news media, popular culture and philosophy across cultures, and will pay particular attention to representations from the global South.

Confirmed speakers: Prof. Jay Clayton, Vanderbilt; Prof. Clare Hanson, Southampton; Dr Josie Gill, Bristol; Dr Shital Pravinchandra, QMUL; Dr Jerome De Groot, Manchester; Dr Jenny Bangham, Cambridge; Dr Lucy Burke, Manchester Met; Dr Lara Choksey, Exeter.

Topics for consideration may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • How creative works from around the world engage with scientific concepts of the gene, genomics, epigenetics, as well as related ideas including human variation, inheritance and ancestry;
  • How genes, the human genome, heredity, and ownership of genetic information are conceptualised across different cultural frameworks;
  • How cultural texts are both influenced by, and help to shape understandings of, genetic science;
  • How cultural texts negotiate questions of identity (including race, disability, gender, sexuality, and species) in relation to genetics;
  • Representations of genetic research, including its methodologies, dissemination, and ethics;
  • Postcolonial/decolonial/indigenous approaches to the legal, ethical, regulatory, and market frameworks of the life sciences;
  • The relationships between genre, form and genetic representations.

We welcome perspectives from disciplines including literary studies, film studies, history, law, media and cultural studies, critical and cultural theory, philosophy, postcolonial studies, critical medical humanities, disability studies, and bioethics. We are also keen to include participation from creative practitioners (writers, filmmakers, visual artists, performance artists) whose work engages with genetic science, and welcome proposals for creative sessions (film screenings, readings, performances, art exhibits).

Please submit 300-word proposals plus a short bio (100 words) to Clare Barker at c.f.barker@leeds.ac.uk. We also have a limited number of spaces for non-speaking participants; if you would like to attend please submit a short description (200 words max) of how the symposium relates to your field of research, creative or professional practice. The closing date for submissions is Friday 21 December 2018.

This symposium is part of a University of Leeds research project on ‘Genetics and Biocolonialism in Contemporary Literature and Film’ and is funded by a Wellcome Trust Seed Award [grant number 106839/Z/15/Z]. Attendance is free and catering will be provided for all delegates. Accommodation and travel expenses will be covered for all invited speakers.

CFP: Edited Collection, ‘Disability and the Media: Other Bodies’

Deadline: Friday 21st December 2018

Call for chapter proposals for the edited collection Disability and the Media: Other Bodies on the themes of disability, bodies, media and representation in Asia.

Disability and the Media is edited by Diana Garrisi (JC School of Film and Television Arts, Xi’an Jiaotong Liverpool University) and Jacob Johanssen (Communication and Media Research Institute, University of Westminster). It is under contract with Routledge and due to be published 2019 in the Routledge Research in Disability and Media Studies series.

Using a variety of theoretical and methodological approaches this volume  encompasses an array of media forms including cinema, newspapers, television, advertising and social media. This book has several purposes. It critically discusses the relationship between self-representation and representations in either reinforcing or debunking myths around disability and othering. It explores the cultural, political and commercial basis for why media can negatively portray some people as intrinsically different. Finally, it suggests that the dynamic relationship between traditional and new media and the blurred lines between forms of representation and self-representation in new media can make it more difficult to continue framing ability and disability as mutually exclusive categories, and therefore cast the latter as unwanted. The book presents instances of a possible, slow cultural shift in favour of non-dichotomic views on ability and disability increasingly represented as fluid and necessary conditions characterizing the essence of each human being.

We are specifically interested in chapters that focus on Asia and its different countries in relation to the themes of the book.

Possible themes include but are not limited to:

  • Affective labour of bodies
  • Auto-ethnographic accounts of the body in / through digital media
  • Celebrity bodies and the spectacles of transformation
  • Cinema and disability
  • Contemporary coverage of disability in print/online/television/radio
  • De-colonizing and de-westernising the mediated body
  • Disability and advertising
  • Disability and race
  • Disability and the media: historical perspectives
  • (Dis)Empowerments of the disabled body
  • Journalism and practices of othering the body
  • Neoliberalism, policy and austerity politics
  • Reality television and the body
  • Representing wounds and scars
  • Researching bodies and the media: frameworks and methodologies
  • Stigma and the body
  • Posthumanist and non-representational frameworks
  • The abject body
  • The body and trauma
  • The mediated body as spectacle
  • The medicalised body in the media
  • The objectification of the disabled body in the media

We invite submissions of 200-250 words chapter proposals.

Deadline: Friday 21st December 2018.

Submissions should also include:

  • Title of chapter
  •  Author name/s, institutional details
  • Corresponding author’s email address
  • Keywords (no more than 5)
  • A short bio

Please send chapters to diana.garrisi@xjtlu.edu.cn and j.johanssen@westminster.ac.uk. 

Commissioned chapters are around 5,000 words. The fact that an abstract is accepted does not guarantee publication of the final manuscript. All chapters submitted will be judged on the basis of a double-blind reviewing process.

CFP: ‘Experiences of Dis/ability from the Late Middle Ages to the Mid-Twentieth Century’, Tampere, Finland

Date: 22nd – 23rd August 2019

Location: University of Tampere, Finland

Keynote speakers:

  • David Lederer, Maynooth University
  • Donna Trembinski, St. Francis Xavier University
  • David Turner, Swansea University

In recent decades, dis/ability history has become an important field in its own right, standing at the crossroads of the social history of medicine, the history of minorities and the history of everyday life. Conceptions of and attitudes to physical and mental wellbeing and to difference are and have always been key elements in any human society, while the lived experience of dis/ability has varied across societies and time periods, but also depending on the person’s socioeconomic status, age, gender, and the nature of the impairment. Experiences of disability, whether personal or communal, have long continuities in the past, but they have also changed dramatically with the development of medical science and institutionalized care.

This conference aims to concentrate on the experiences of those with physical or mental impairments and chronic illnesses, with special reference to the period between the late Middle Ages and the mid-twentieth century. We understand dis/ability in a broad sense, covering a wide range of physical, mental and intellectual impairments and chronic illnesses. How, then, were various dis/abilities lived and experienced, how did communities shape these experiences, and what similarities and changes can we detect over the course of time? An important viewpoint is also that of methodology: how can a modern scholar approach the experience of those living in the past?

We thus invite papers that explore the ways in which ‘disabilities’ have been lived and experienced, in all stages of life, and by people of different social status and background. The conference aims to promote dialogue between disability historians across national and chronological borders and we welcome papers presenting new research and work in progress.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • How to approach the experience of disability (sources, methodology)?
  • Different categories of disability experience, or what counts as experience of disability?
  • How have society, religion and practices of care and cure defined the experience of disability?
  • Religion and disability
  • Medicalization, institutionalization and everyday life
  • The impact of gender, age and social status on the experience of disability
  • Lived welfare and everyday experiences of people with disabilities, e.g. living at home, in a workhouse or mental institution, the impact of various welfare systems

To submit a proposal, please send title and abstract of 200 words, with your contact information and affiliation by 15th February 2019, at https://www.lyyti.in/disabilityexperience2019_callforpapers

Conference website: https://events.uta.fi/disabilityexperience2019/

Participation is free of charge, and includes lunches and coffees for speakers.

The conference is organized by the Academy of Finland Centre of Excellence in the History of Experiences (HEX, https://research.uta.fi/hex/) at the University of Tampere and the group “Lived Religion” and has received funding from The Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation and HEX. For more information, please write to the organizers (jenni.kuuliala@uta.fi and riikka.miettinen@uta.fi)

 

Call for Creative Writing: ‘Hearing and the Medical Humanities’, eds. Derek Hoare and Bonnie Millar

Call for Creative Writing: 

Whether you are trying to come to terms with your hearing or looking for a way to help loved one/ a patient come to terms with their hearing ability, writing can be a helpful outlet. To accompany a special edition of the journal Medical Humanities, edited by Dr Derek Hoare and Dr Bonnie Millar, we invite poems and prose about hearing from patients, their partners and /or family members, and clinicians. Contributions are welcome from those with hearing aids, cochlear implants, tinnitus, and hyperacusis; parents of children affected with otitis media; audiologists and physicians.

How do we respond when we meet people who do not hear as we do? What happens when our own hearing function changes? What tools do we have when attempting to communicate about our hearing? By inviting those who hear differently, their partners, and/or family members, together with clinicians to share poems and short pieces of writing it is hoped to foster exchange and understanding between different groups.

Submissions might include, but are not restricted to, the following topics

  • Deaf culture
  • Deafened
  • Sensitivity to sound
  • Listening differently
  • Auditory transformations
  • Hearing and language
  • Hearing and technology
  • Hearing and the media
  • Hearing and emotions

All are welcome to submit pieces and please share this invitation with interested colleagues. Please send submissions to Bonnie.Millar@nottingham.ac.uk.

CPF: Critical Disability Discourses

Critical Disability Discourses is a graduate student journal based out of York University that provides a platform for new and emerging scholars, community researchers, and artists who practice and present critical approaches to disability issues and experiences.

For this ninth installation of the journal, our Editorial Team is casting a wide net to gather research and artwork from a variety of disability perspectives emanating from academic study, personal experience, and community-based projects and advocacy. Full-length articles, short films, audio-based works, and photographic essays are among the diverse range of mediums that contributors may wish to explore.

To challenge established paradigms around the location of knowledge, we aim to prioritize submissions from authors and artists whose identities, stories, communities, and contexts have been excluded or insufficiently represented in dominant disability cultures.

Interested contributors are also invited to propose book and film reviews, or select from a list of suggested titles.

Submission Process and Deadline:

Please send your completed submission or review proposal to CDD Managing Editor, Natalie Spagnuolo, at cdsj@yorku.ca by November 20th 2018.

Please ensure your article follows APA style guidelines and includes both an abstract and list of keywords.

We ask that contributors submitting visual or audio work provide captions, transcripts, and any other content that will help ensure your work can be accessed by our readership.

Authors are responsible for familiarizing themselves with CDD’s submission guidelines, which can be accessed online at

https://cdd.journals.yorku.ca/index.php/cdd/about/submissions#authorGuidelines

Any inquiries can be sent to cdsj@yorku.ca.

CFP: ‘Ageing, Illness, Care in Literary and Cultural Narratives’, Huddersfield

Date: Thurs 5th – Friday 6th September 2019

Location: University of Huddersfield, UK

Keynotes speakers:

  • Sally Chivers, Trent University, Canada
  • Amelia DeFalco, University of Leeds, UK
  • Margaret Morganroth Gullette, Brandeis University, US (by skype)

Stories about ageing, illness and care permeate ageing societies. Although illness and care are not an inevitable part of ageing, ageing, especially advanced ageing, is often associated with greater infirmity and increasing dependence on others. Common media representations evoke the apocalyptic effects of the burden of care as they pit a younger, able-bodied workforce against an ageing and frail population that threatens to bring financial disaster. And, yet, care is part of all of our lives: we live in a web of relations that support embodied life. As many in the field of feminist ethics of care have shown, serious illness and the care it necessitates focuses our attention on the very nature of selfhood and citizenship, as the prized neoliberal values of autonomy, independence and choice are undermined by intimate relationships between selves. Ageing, illness and care generate a complex nexus of affective, social and political relations and interactions that raise ethical questions about self and other.

Literary and cultural narratives negotiate, and help us to explore, this web of interactions and the complex questions about subjectivity that they raise. Reading and writing about ageing, illness and care also encourages us to engage with the challenges that these may pose to individuals and to society. As we do so, we inevitably consider the representational limits and the possibilities of literary and cultural narratives.

This conference welcomes papers that explore the intersections of ageing, illness and care in literary and cultural narratives in English and other languages; including prose fiction, poetry, life writing, comics, film and the media. Papers may engage with fields such as ageing studies, disability studies, queer studies, philosophy and creative writing, but are not limited to these areas of study. The language of the conference is English.

We invite proposals for:

  • 20-minute papers. Abstracts of approximately 300 words should be accompanied by a short biographical note.
  • 10-minute presentations based on a pre-circulated paper to allow for longer and more focused discussion. Abstracts of approximately 300 words should be accompanied by a short biographical note
  • Workshops and panels. Panels should consist of three papers and the proposal should include abstracts for the panel and for each of the papers as well as the email address for correspondence. Workshop organisers should send an abstract outlining the scope and nature of the workshop along with details of all participants and the email for correspondence.

Submissions should be emailed to Katsura Sako and Sarah Falcus at
ageing@hud.ac.uk.

Closing date for submissions: 11th February, 2019. Speakers will be
notified of acceptance by 31 March.

This event is funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science
(KAKENHI: Project No. 17KK0030).