CFP: ‘Curating Health: Graphic Medicine and Visual Representations of Illness’, Stockholm

Location: Stockholm University

Date: Mon 3rd – Tues 4th December 2018

The Nordic Network for Gender, Body, Health, in collaboration with the Division for Gender Studies, Stockholm University, presents ‘Curating Health: Graphic Medicine and Visual Representations of Illness’.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Prof. Lisa Diedrich, Stony Brook University
  • Dr. Ian Williams, Manchester Medical School and Graphic Medicine

We invite individual presentations, panel proposals or artistic contributions from across a range of disciplines in the Humanities, Practice Arts, Social Sciences and Biomedicine that engage with the theme of graphic medicine and visual representations of health and illness in all their dimensions. Graphic medicine is one major theme, but proposals may also focus on other forms of (experimental) visual representation in areas such as autobiography and memoir, poster art and display, and visual narratives.

We are particularly interested in papers that address the power differentials of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, crip, queer and ageing.

The deadline for abstract submissions is 15th August 2018. 

Send abstracts of no more than 300 words, including a biography of no more than 100 words, to genderbodyhealth@gmail.com.

The Nordic Network for Gender, Body, Health will celebrate its 10th year with a reception during the conference. The Network is currently based in Sweden but has more than 200 members from across Europe. Previous international conferences and workshops include: Disability, Arts and Health (Bergen); Monitoring the Self (Helsinki); Interrogating Prostheses (Stockholm); Re-imagining Transplantation (Copenhagen).

Please visit our website genderbodyhealth.wordpress.com for further details of past events and the upcoming conference.

CFP: ‘”The Disease of Caring”: Medical Professionals and Activism from the Nineteenth Century to the Present’, London

Date: Friday 26th October 2018

Location: School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

Supported by the Birkbeck/Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund and the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

Keynote speaker: Dr Anne Hanley (Birkbeck)

In In Darkest London (1891), Margaret Harkness’s popular novel about activism to alleviate poverty conditions in late nineteenth-century London, a doctor practising in a slum neighbourhood speaks of the ‘disease of caring’ that prompts him to give medical care to people in need of much wider social change. Harkness herself had trained as a nurse and pharmacist and her medical knowledge continued to inform her activist work throughout her working life. Both her own career and the fictional doctor in her novel reflect how, as medical care became increasingly professionalised over the course of the nineteenth century, discourses of medicine, social influence, and activism also grew interlinked. From the radical revisions of care provision developed by nurses such as Mary Seacole and Florence Nightingale during and after the Crimean War, to the widening of access to safe and effective birth control by activists from Annie Besant to Marie Stopes, to the founding of the NHS, to protests of junior doctors in the present day, the giving of medical care has often been a radical act, and givers of medical care have often allied themselves with a wide range of activist causes. This one-day symposium will aim to create a dialogue between examples and intentions of medical activists historically and in the present day.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers or poster presentations on medical activism in a broad sense. Papers may wish to address the following topics:

  • Equality of care and access to care
  • Conditions for medical work and care-giving, from field hospitals in the Crimean War to present-day hospital crises
  • Personal recognition within the medical profession, from women’s right to practise to demonstrations and strikes of junior doctors
  • Public health, from sanitation projects in the nineteenth century to obesity in the present day
  • Medical care as activism, from slum doctors in the nineteenth century to Médecins sans frontiers
  • The activism of medical professionals in non-medical fields
  • Patient choice and engagement

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to Flore Janssen at activistmedics@gmail.com by Monday 30th July 2018. If your proposal is for a poster presentation, please indicate this clearly. Please include with your abstract a biographical statement of no more than 100 words.

For more information, visit the Disease of Caring website.

CFP: Book Proposals, ‘Language, Discourse and Mental Health’, University of Exeter Press

The editors are very pleased to announce the new book series “Language, Discourse and Mental Health” published with the University of Exeter Press. This book series is a unique resource to further knowledge and understanding of mental health from a pluralistically informed linguistic perspective.

Using qualitative and quantitative approaches to language-based analysis, the empirical and theoretical contributions will provide a compelling insight on mental health from a range of perspectives and contexts, including psychotherapeutic communication, public presentations of mental health, literary accounts of lived experiences, and language features associated to specific mental health problems. This interdisciplinary book series will be an essential reference for students, researchers and practitioners in linguistics and communication, education, cognitive science, psychology, counselling and psychotherapy, special needs, medicine, nursing, and medical anthropology.

Scope of the Book Series

The book series is framed in terms of linguistic perspectives that differentiate between communication about mental health (i.e., language performance or use), and the communication of individuals with mental health problems (i.e., language competence or systems) in real-world and research contexts. Such a focus is anticipated to be captured through the following linguistic perspectives: sociolinguistics and sociocultural linguistics, cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics, literary linguistics and stylistics. These can be applied through a range of language-based methodologies, including qualitative methods (e.g., discourse analysis, conversation analysis, interpretative phenomenological analysis, narrative analysis, thematic analysis), quantitative methods (e.g., corpus-based approaches, quantitative content analysis), and also experimental methods.

Consistent with an interdisciplinary framework that seeks to encourage and strengthen interdisciplinary research of mental health, the book series aims to encompass a wide repertoire different theoretical and philosophical views and a broad range of themes that add significant value to the field of mental health research, including:

  • ‘Understanding of mental health and mental health problems’ by developing empirical and theoretical knowledge of mental health from different perspectives.
  • ‘Living with mental health problems’ by improving understanding of individuals’ perceptions of living with mental health problems.
  • ‘Effective interventions’ by focussing on the effectiveness of psychological intervention in the treatment and prevention of mental health problems.
  • ‘Wider inequalities in society’ (e.g., issues around gender, ethnicity, poverty sexuality and faith).
  • ‘Vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations’ in society, including drug users, migrants and homeless people.

Call for Book Proposals

The book series “Language, Discourse and Mental Health” is accepting book proposals for monographs and edited volumes. To discuss your book proposal, please contact the book series editors,  Dr Laura A. Cariola, Dr Stefan Ecks, Dr Billy Lee, Dr Lisa Mikesell, Dr Anders Nordahl-Hansen. The book series will launch in spring 2019.

Book proposal form: UEP – CE Book Proposal Form 2018 (see also http://www.exeterpress.co.uk/for-authors)

CFP: ‘Dementia, Violence, and the Politics of Memory in Contemporary Literature, Film, and Comics’, workshop and publication, Berlin

Location: Workshop at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Date: 13th – 15th September 2018

Deadline: 13th May 2018

CfP for an edited volume or peer-reviewed special journal issue, preceded by a workshop at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany (Sept. 13-15, 2018).

In public discourse and the day-to-day provision of health care, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are predominantly regarded as illnesses afflicting individuals. Although diseases of memory can have great impact on relatives, caregivers, and communities, stories of dementia are not necessarily understood as entailing any wider political meaning and it seems common sense not to hold dementia patients accountable for their affliction. At the same time, however (in Western societies at least), memory loss is not always viewed purely as a contingent, ‘neutral’ neurobiological process but can tie into political debates, especially in the context of WW II and the Holocaust but also other experiences of racial/ political violence and trauma, e.g. in the context of colonialism, slavery, genocide, and forced migration in or across Europe, the Americas, and beyond.

In perpetrator societies, dementia-induced amnesia can be interpreted to be a wilful refusal to remember (the neurobiological equivalent of repression), and sufferers might even be blamed for strategically ‘giving in’ to their disease at a specific point in time in order to avoid confrontation with their past. This happened in Germany when Walter Jens, rhetorics professor and influential post-war public intellectual, succumbed to Alzheimer’s at the very moment the media uncovered the facts that he had applied for membership to the NSDAP and published anti-Semitic essays whilst still a student of literature (see Tilman Jens’ 2009 essay Demenz: Abschied von meinem Vater).

In the case of both victims and perpetrators of traumatic injustice and violence, dementia may reveal previously buried or hidden memories (as is imagined in Elie Wiesel’s L’oublié, 1989, Irene Dische’s The Doctor Needs a Home, 1995, Nicole Krauss’ Great House, 2010, or Cécile Wajsbrot’s L’hydre de Lerne, 2011, and David Chariandy’s Soucouyant, 2007). Dementia and amnesia, in these cases, paradoxically reveal rather than conceal uncomfortable truths – in our current cultural moment, given the amount of time that has passed since WW II and the Holocaust, they may do so for the last time. In the context of forced migration, demented protagonists may return to their childhood language and re-enact (traumatic) memories, challenging their status as survivors and their successful integration into their countries of destination (see e.g. Bernlef’s 1984 novel Hersenschimmen).

Memory theorists and cultural studies scholars have raised the fact that our memory culture will change once the last eyewitnesses of 20th century catastrophes have died – communicative memory will turn into cultural memory, to put it in Jan Assmann’s terms. Should the increasing focus on protagonists with dementia in recent books and films be understood as related to this development? Is dementia in these contexts a simple plot device, is the illness depicted realistically, and/ or is it used as a metaphor to raise
larger cultural and socio-political issues? How do literary texts, films, or comics conceptualise the dynamics of remembering and forgetting and the interrelations between ‘real’, repressed, re/imagined memories, or those (un)covered by screen memories? What are the political repercussions and the larger cultural impact of these works? What kind(s) of ‘truth’ do they propose; what is at stake when dementia meets history and politics?

We invite previously unpublished papers from scholars from various disciplines, such as literary, film and comics studies, history, cultural studies, at all career stages, from postgraduates to senior academics. Contributions should be written in English and focus on literary texts, films, or comics (from any cultural context). Workshop participants will receive funding to cover travel and accommodation expenses. The
2018 workshop may be followed by another meeting of contributing authors in 2019.

We hope that the workshop discussions in September 2018 will incite resonance in speakers’ papers to result in the production of a high-quality publication. The final articles should be about 7000 words long and will be due in spring 2019.

Workshop convenors/ volume editors:

  • Irmela Marei Krüger-Fürhoff (Freie Universität Berlin)
  • Nina Schmidt (Freie Universität Berlin)
  • Sue Vice (University of Sheffield)

Please send your English-language abstract of max. 300 words by 13th May 2018 to:
i.krueger-fuerhoff@fu-berlin.de.

The workshop is organised by the PathoGraphics research team at Freie Universität Berlin, Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of Literary Studies: www.fsgs.fu-berlin.de/pathographics.

McCarthy Award for History of Medicine Research, Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

Awarding Body: Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

Deadline: 31st August 2018

The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh has set up an annual award for history of medicine research, specifically focused on the history of Scottish medicine. The purpose of this award is to support and develop the study of the history of medicine in Scotland. The prize for this award is £500.

Eligibility

This award is open to all researchers in the history of medicine, or related social and cultural history fields. Researchers can be based in the United Kingdom or overseas. Please be aware that for overseas finalists, travel expenses to the event will only be paid from their point of entry into the United Kingdom.

Application and Selection Procedure

Research must be unpublished and must have been undertaken in the last 3 years. Research which has been submitted for publication will be considered, but details should be given of when and where it has been submitted, and if it has been accepted for publication. Abstracts must be based on original research in the field.

The deadline for submissions is 31 August 2018. Abstracts must be submitted in either PDF or Word format along with a completed application form and curriculum vitae. The abstract must not exceed 1000 words in length. The curriculum vitae must not exceed two sides of A4. Applicants, if chosen, must be willing to present their research on Friday 19 October 2018. This is a public event, to encourage engagement with the history of medicine in Scotland.

The Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh will publish the winning paper. The winner will also be asked to submit a guest blog post on their research for publication on the College’s heritage blog.
The award can only be awarded to an individual once.

The application form an be downloaded at https://www.rcpe.ac.uk/college/mccarthy-award-history-medicine-research.

CFP: Substance Use and Abuse in the Long Nineteenth Century, Edge Hill

Location: Edge Hill University, Ormskirk

Conference: 13th – 14th September 2018

Deadline: 21st May 2018

Speakers:

  • Professor Susan Zieger, University of California Riverside
  • Dr Noelle Plack, Newman University
  • Dr Douglas Small, University of Glasgow

‘The body (follow me closely here) lies at the mercy of the most omnipotent of all potentates—the Chemist.’

Wilkie Collins, The Woman in White (1859)

In The Woman in White Collins’s villainous Count Fosco expounds on the power of modern pharmacology. Fosco is speaking at the mid-point of a century wherein the body and the mind seemed increasingly easily affected by the influence of substances. From 1821 opium had allowed Thomas de Quincey to explore ‘the palimpsest of the human mind’ and navigate the dream space of the human subconscious. Ether and chloroform banished pain and facilitated new surgical innovations. Stimulants and sedatives regulated waking and sleeping and the working day in between. Reports of alcoholism, addiction and criminality appeared with increasing regularity in the periodical press and featured in the plots of new literary genres like the sensation novel and the detective story.

This two day interdisciplinary conference examines the changing roles of drugs and chemical substances in the history, literature, and medical discourses of the long nineteenth century. We invite proposals for 15-20 minute papers or panels on any aspect of the theme. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Addiction and excess: Alcohol, tobacco, opiates, cocaine, ether, chloroform and other compounds
  • Psychoactive substances, hallucinogenics, pharmacology
  • New drug treatments, therapies, medical technologies, pain and pain management
  • Concepts of stimulation and sedation
  • Drugs and creativity
  • Drugs and criminality
  • Substances and the media: celebrity culture, advertising,
  • Thomas de Quincey, Coleridge, Keats, Wilkie Collins, L. T. Meade Conan Doyle,
  • Novels, sensation fiction, and literature as addiction
  • Gendered representations of substance use
  • Aphrodisiacs, appetite and their suppressants
  • Substances and the military, empire, trade, war
  • Neo-Romantic or Neo-Victorian representations of substance use

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words together with a brief bio to substance18@edgehill.ac.uk  by 21st May.

We are delighted to be able to award a number of postgraduate bursaries. If you would like to be considered for a bursary, please include a 200-word explanation about how the conference relates to your research, along with a breakdown of your expenses.

Please see our website https://substance18.wordpress.com/ for more information.

 

CFP, Panel Proposal: ‘Food as medicine: biosocialities of eating in health and illness’, Oxford

Date: 18th – 21st Sept. 2018

Location: University of Oxford

Deadline: 15th April 2018

Paper proposals are now invited for the panel ‘Food as medicine: biosocialities of eating in health and illness’, which will take place at the Association of Social Anthropologists of the UK and Commonwealth (ASA) conference, at the University of Oxford, 18-21 September 2018 (ASA18).

Entanglements of health, illness, and eating offer a critical lens onto the social, material, and imagined dimensions of gastro-politics. Imbalanced diets, lack of appetite, ‘overindulgence’, food contamination, and malnutrition are among the iniquitous aspects of eating implicated in the diagnosis of disorder, disease, and their concomitant marginalized biosocialities. In turn, food is also reconfigured as medicine; it is used in the restoration of health and the management of chronic conditions, as well as to resocialise marginalized bodies and identities into bio-political realignment with social hierarchy, citizenship, responsibility, and choice.

This panel examines food-as-medicine at the convergence of material, intangible, social, imagined, and biological aspects of healing. The papers will consider medicalized transformations of intimacy, commensality, and power in feeding and eating. They will trace experiential liminalities of ‘recovery’ through feeding spaces and technologies, elucidating contradictions and reconfigurations of agency/disempowerment, body sovereignty, and liability in processes of healing through food. Representing diverse ethnographic foci and locales, analyses will theorise food as medicine as experienced by people with neurological conditions, people who have had bariatric/metabolic surgery, and people with eating disorders and other mental health conditions, among others. Together, these accounts will emphasize the intangible, haptic, and biopolitical dimensions of food as medicine, interrogating how ‘recovery’ may be induced through forced, relearned, assisted, and measured forms of ingestion. Alongside their papers, panellists will present items that experientially convey textures and temporalities of food-as-medicine, including meal replacements, timers, scales, and measuring cups, highlighting the sensory aspects of these medicalized materialities.

The deadline for paper proposals is 20th April 2018. Please submit your paper proposal through the panel page.

For informal inquiries, please contact panel convenors Heather HowardNarelle WarrenAnna Lavis, and Karin Eli.

CFP: ‘Mind Reading 2018 – Mental Health and the Written Word’, Birmingham

Date: 18th – 19th June 20818

Location: University of Brimingham

‘Mind Reading 2018 – Mental Health and the Written Word’ is the second in this medical humanities series to ask a series of questions:

Do clinicians and patients speak the same language? How might we bridge the evident gaps in communication? How can we use narrative to foster clinical relationships? Or to care for the carers? How does illness impact upon our sense of self?

This two-day programme of talks and workshops is a collaboration between the University of BirminghamUCD Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, and the Diseases of Modern Life and Constructing Scientific Communities Projects at St Anne’s College, Oxford. Together we seek to explore productive interactions between narrative and mental health both historically and in the present day. Bringing together psychologists, psychiatrists, GPs, service users, and historians of literature and medicine, we will investigate the patient experience through the prism of literature and personal narrative to inform patient-centred care and practice, and focus on ways in which literature might be beneficial in cases of burnout and sympathy fatigue.

Confirmed speakers include:

The conference programme is available here: Mind Reading Programme

Registration is now open and can be booked here.

CFP: ‘Storytelling as a Way of Bridging Cultural Divides’, York

Date: 9am-2pm, 6th June 2018

Location: Humanities Research Centre, University of York, Heslington, York

Deadline: 15th May 2018

A workshop on “Storytelling as a Way of Bridging Cultural Divides” is being organised by Christa Knellwolf King, Associate Professor of English literature at Sultan Qaboos University, Oman, and an Honorary Visiting Fellow at the University of York.

The theme of this interdisciplinary workshop is inspired by recent studies which have shown that fictional and factual narratives profoundly affect the minds of readers: they evoke empathy, stimulate reader identification, and forge relationships between readers, characters, and the cultural communities on which they are modelled. Stories are an absolutely crucial aspect of human experience, and the process of creating an active response can have many positive effects. Storytelling can be used to integrate oral memories of communities into the lived experience of the present; it can provide the basis for respectful relationships between local inhabitants and the visitors to heritage sites; and last but not least, it can provide a dialogue space in conflict zones. Here is a great opportunity for the humanities to design projects that “use” stories as a means of generating openness to otherness.

The workshop explores the many positive effects of engaging creatively with stories, told in written and oral form, and in film as well as other media. It invites its participants to create initiatives that apply the principles of experience design in order to engender understanding and respect for cultural differences, without attempting to control audience responses. A further aim of the workshop is to initiate an interdisciplinary research project between the UK and the Middle East. Contributions are invited from colleagues working in the fields of literature, film and media studies, linguistics, cultural heritage, tourism, history, translation, development studies, peace studies, and related disciplines.

Please email a proposal of 200-300 words to Christa Knellwolf King by 15th May 2018. Please also feel free to send comments and suggestions.

CFP: Emerging and New Researchers in the Geographies of Health and Impairment Conference 2018, Bristol

Location: University of Bristol

Date: 18th – 19th June 2018

Deadline: 16th April 2018.

Papers are invited for 19th ENRGHI Conference, a two-day event organised by and for post-graduates and early career researchers, with generous support from the RGS (with IBG) Geographies of Health and Wellbeing Research Group (GHWRG). This longstanding conference offers a supportive environment to showcase research; providing valuable opportunities for networking, research feedback and discussion with researchers and students who have a shared interest in geographies of health, wellbeing, and impairment.

Attracting an international audience, the conference welcomes abstracts from individuals involved in health or wellbeing research within social, geographical, and/or environmental contexts. We invite submissions from both those working within and outside of geography as a discipline. The 2018 conference will take place on the 18th and 19th June 2018, hosted by the University of Bristol.

Conference papers can be based on work-in-progress or completed work. PhD students are encouraged to focus on a particular study aspect, such as a specific method, a literature review, or one aspect of empirical findings, rather than trying to cover their whole project.

The scope of the conference is broad in order to reflect the diversity of topics and research approaches utilised within the field of health, wellbeing, and impairment. Topics covered in previous conferences have included:

  • Health inequalities, environmental justice, and equity
  • Therapeutic landscapes, green/blue and ‘enabling’ spaces
  • Health and wellbeing through the life course
  • Mental health, everyday life, disability, and stigma
  • Migration, mobilities, and health
  • Health-related behaviours and practices
  • Health-care delivery and access to services
  • Health, mapping, and spatial analysis
  • Health and health care in the Developing World

Additional topics of interest could include but are by no means limited to:

  • Health tourism
  • Healthy ‘norms’, socio-cultural dynamics, and moral judgements
  • Traditional medicine and healing
  • Environmental exposures and risk perception
  • Innovative methods for exploring geographies of health and impairment

Guidelines for Submissions:

Abstracts should be no longer than 250 words. Please also provide the title, author(s), and affiliation. Oral presentations will be 10 minutes, followed by five minutes of discussion. Posters should be A0 in size and there will be designated time slots for poster presentations during the conference. Please state whether you are interested in doing a presentation, poster and/or chairing a session. Abstracts should be emailed to the organisers with the subject title as ENRGHI CfP by Monday 16th April 2018.

Prizes for the best presentations will be nominated by delegates and awarded at the end of the conference. Details of registration and travel bursaries will be made available in March on the ENRGHI 2018 website.