CFP: ‘Subjectivity, Self-Narratives and the History of Emotions Masterclass’, Sussex

Date: 16th – 18th January 2019

Location: Attenborough Centre for the Creative Arts, University of Sussex

Deadline: 27th July 2018

Subjectivity, Self-Narratives and the History of Emotions Masterclass:
A British Academy Rising Stars Engagement Event

Where many History of Emotions studies have focused on norms and discourses, this event asks how we can explore how thoughts and feelings could be articulated, expressed and repressed through what is understood as individual subjectivities. This approach is crucial if we are to understand why people act in certain ways and thus how historical change occurs. In short, it focuses on exploring subjective experience and emotional practices: the way in which emotions are performed and produced by a historically-situated body. This British Academy Rising Stars Engagement Event comprises of a two-day masterclass, which links up Early Career Researchers with leaders in the field, and a one-day international symposium. The event will focus on knowledge sharing and network creation to build future collaborations.
Applications are invited from Early Career Researchers for approximately 15 participants for a two-day masterclass (16th – 17th January 2019) led by leaders in the field of the History of Emotions and historical subjectivities. There will be four workshop sessions over the first two days, each led by a mentor, including:

  • Lyndal Roper (Oxford)
  • Thomas Dixon (QMUL)
  • Claire Langhamer (Sussex)
  • Penny Summerfield (Manchester)

This workshop provides a unique opportunity for participants to closely engage with experts in the field, and to work in a methodologically rigorous way with different approaches to emotions and subjectivities. At the core of the masterclass will be a focus on close engagement with participants’ work and discussion of creative methodologies, as well as a development of cross-period perspectives (from early modern to modern).

The masterclass will then be followed by a one-day international symposium on 18th January 2019, which will promote engagement on an international scale and include keynote speakers such as William Reddy, Ute Frevert, Tim Hitchcock as well as keynotes from the masterclass convenors, Lyndal Roper, Thomas Dixon, Claire Langhamer and Penny Summerfield, and which masterclass participants will be expected to attend.

Participants will be asked to bring a primary source in which emotions and/or subjectivities can be explored to the masterclass, and to pre-circulate amongst other participants and mentors a short piece of writing outlining their research project(s) and the methodological questions and approaches that they are engaged with relating to emotions and subjectivities (approx. 1000 words). This will allow for ideas and approaches to be shared and productively discussed. A reader with relevant texts for each session will be circulated in the months prior to the masterclass. Through these sessions, we aim to cultivate a network on emotions and subjectivities and enable participants and mentors continue to work with each other after the event.

Application

Applicants are requested to submit a CV, short bio (200 words max), and explanation of motivation (500 words max). In the explanation of motivation please indicate the relevance of your research to the themes of the event, outline what questions you would like to work through in the masterclass and how your research might benefit from participating. Please also give a brief description of the possible primary source you would bring to the masterclass and its thematic relevance.
Applications should be sent to the following email address: historyofemotions2019@gmail.com.

The deadline for completed applications is 27 July 2018. Please email Emilia the Event Co-ordinator at the email below if you have any queries regarding the event or application.

Financial Assistance

A contribution towards travel and accommodation expenses will be provided. Food and refreshments will be provided throughout the two-day masterclass and one-day symposium.

Conference Organiser
Dr Laura Kounine: l.kounine@sussex.ac.uk

Event Co-ordinator
Emilia Halton-Hernandez: e.halton-hernandez@sussex.ac.uk

For more information, please see: https://historyofemotions2019.com/call-for-participants/

CFP: ‘Metaphoric Stammers and Embodied Speakers Conference’, Dublin

Date: Friday 12th October 2018

Location: Humanities Institute, University College Dublin, Dublin

Deadline: Friday 27th July 2018

Metaphoric Stammers and Embodied Speakers: Expanding the Borders of Dysfluency Studies 

Keynote speaker: Chris Eagle, Emory University, Centre for the Study of Human Health (Dysfluencies: On Speech Disorders in Modern Literature, 2014; Talking Normal: Literature, Speech Disorders, and Disability, ed. 2013)

The conference will explore the embodied experience and cultural construction of stammering from the collaborative perspectives of literary/cultural analysis, speech therapy and neurological research. The aim of the conference is to develop an interface between literary, cultural and clinical practice in the area of speech ‘disorders’, generating new forms of communication and exchange across these fields.

Despite the centrality of literary/cultural studies to the emergence of Dysfluency Studies (Marc Shell, Stutter 2005; Chris Eagle, Dysfluencies 2014), the 2017 Oxford Dysfluency Conference had no humanities-based papers. This conference addresses this imbalance, bringing cultural analysis into genuine exchange with scientific and therapeutic practice, and necessarily negotiating the tension between a medically-inflected model of ‘recovery’ and an emergent challenge to cultural constructions of ‘normal’ speech. Dysfluency is explored less as a ‘disorder’ to be treated, than a form of communication that highlights the intricate relationship between speaking and being heard, vocal agency and cultural reception.

Literary culture has provided a rich and complex store of information about how stammering has been represented and interpreted at different historical junctures, within diverse cultural contexts and in relation to the variables of gender, class and ethnicity. The stammer has also been harnessed as a metaphor for how literary language works, how it operates at the limits of its expressive resources, occupying a territory that circles the paradoxical power of the ineffable. Recent work in the humanities, however, has signalled the need to balance such metaphorical readings with a sense of the corporeal experience of dysfluency, what Jay Dolmage has called ‘the embodied struggle for expression’ (Disability Rhetoric 2014). This renewed focus on embodiment invites diverse, interdisciplinary approaches that serve to accentuate the embodied experience of stammering in its neurological, therapeutic and cultural forms.

Proposals are welcomed for twenty-minute papers in (but not limited to) the following areas:

  • Normative Speech and Varieties of Expression: cultural constructions of ‘normal’ speech and the representation of ‘counter voices’ of dysfluency.
  • Rethinking ‘Recovery’: innovations in therapeutic practice (e.g., Narrative Therapy, Non-Avoidance Therapy, Covert/Interiorised Stammering Therapy).
  • Mapping the Brain: neurological perspectives, auditory feedback, and ‘circuits’ of communication.
  • Gender and Dysfluency: gendered experience and its reception/representation.

Guide for submissions:

All submissions should include name and email address, a 250-word abstract, a short biography (with academic/professional affiliation, if applicable). Proposals for individual papers or panels of 3 papers are welcomed. Panels that include presenters with a range of affiliations, career experiences and disciplinary homes are encouraged.

All proposals should be submitted as Word document.

Extended deadline for submissions: Friday 27 July 2018.

Organiser: Dr Maria Stuart, School of English, Drama, Film and Creative Writing, UCD.

For submission of proposals and general enquiries, please contact: maria.stuart@ucd.ie.

This conference is generously supported by the Humanities Institute, UCD College of Arts and Humanities, and UCD Seed Funding Scheme.

CFP: ‘Arts for Health’ archives research workshop, Manchester

Date: 10.30am – 4.30pm, Monday 6th August (other dates may be added)

Location: Manchester Metropolitan University

Deadline: 22nd July 2018

Wellcome Collection invites early career researchers to participate in a workshop exploring recently catalogued archives and materials relating to arts and health.

The archives

Centred around the archives of Arts for Health, an organisation based at Manchester Metropolitan University since 1988, these collections bring voices from artists living with health issues, arts in health organisations, art practitioners, and others with experience of the arts in health settings. A rich and exciting resource, these materials capture the changing landscape in which arts and health movements have developed in the UK. Emergent themes from the material include the value of patient voices, the influence of politics and funding, hospital designs and uses of art, the language used in arts and health, and much more. Further, these archives offer an insight into the working practices and projects of some of the UK’s key arts and health organisations from the 1980s to 1990s. You can find out more about these materials through this article, or through our catalogue by searching the reference ‘ART/’ on our archives and manuscripts search.

The workshop
Our aim is to encourage researchers to uncover the potential of these archives for current or future research projects.

This informal and engaging workshop will allow you to:

  • see and engage with the material,
  • discuss it with our archivists and each other,
  • explore questions and issues which emerge,
  • reflect upon how the material will be relevant to your research,
  • understand the practicalities of accessing and using this material in research.

We are looking for early career researchers to take part in this workshop, especially PhD students and postdoctoral researchers. There are no disciplinary or methodological requirements, and we welcome a diverse set of approaches and backgrounds. If this material is relevant to your work, we’d love to hear from you.

If you would like to participate, please email Aidan (a.peppin@wellcome.ac.uk) with:

  • details of your research interests,
  • your research background,
  • up to 300 words detailing how your research might draw upon this material.

The deadline for enquiries is Sunday 22nd July.

If you are not available on 6th August, please still register your interest to be kept updated on future workshops.

We can provide some support towards travel and accommodation; if your university cannot support your attendance, please get in touch with us.

Feel free to reach out to the above email with any questions. We look forward to hearing from you.

Registration: ‘Curating the Medical Humanities: a one-day workshop’, London

Date: 9.30am-6pm, Thursday 13th September 2018

Location: Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1E 0PD

J.P. Sennitt, St Francis and the Birds. Credit: Adamson Collection / Wellcome Trust.

Curating the Medical Humanities considers some of the key ethical, intellectual and practical challenges involved in curating medical humanities exhibitions, particularly in relation to questions of audience, accessibility, participation and public engagement.

The workshop developed out of the organisers’ experiences curating the exhibition Mr A Moves in Mysterious Ways: Selected Artists from the Adamson Collection, which was shown at the Peltz Gallery in summer 2017. Curating the exhibition raised significant ethical questions about exhibiting materials produced in art therapeutic contexts, particularly in relation to issues of ownership, creative control, the naming of previously anonymous artists/makers, and the categorisation of such works as either art or medical record.

The workshop brings together academics, artists and curators who are engaged in developing and delivering exhibitions relating to experiences of health and the body. Its aim is to share knowledge of these projects and reflect on best practice across the field, through addressing a number of inter-related questions:

  • How do we conceptualise and define the ‘audience/s’ for the work being done in the medical humanities?
  • What constitutes a successful medical humanities exhibition?
  • How can exhibitions utilise notions of co-production, for example by working with constituent communities?
  • How can exhibitions inform or improve experience of health, as opposed to historicizing or critiquing them?
  • What are the reciprocal relationships between curatorial practice and the medical humanities (i.e. how might each challenge conceived ideas or practices)?
  • How useful is the term ‘medical humanities’ to those working outside the academy?

Confirmed participants include Martha Fleming (V&A Research Institute);Sophie Goggins (National Museums Scotland; Natasha McEnroe and Katy Barrett (Science Museum); Lucy Zacaria (Head of Arts, Imperial College Healthcare Trust); Sam Curtis (Bethlem Gallery); Jane Fradgley (artist (http://janefradgley.com); Victoria Tischler (University of West London); Jocelyn Dodd (University of Leicester); and Katherine Ott (National Museum of American History).

This workshop has been organised by Heather Tilley and Fiona Johnstone and is supported by a Wellcome Trust / Birkbeck Conference and Symposia Support Award.

It will take place in the Keynes Library, Birkbeck School of Arts, 43 Gordon Square, London WC1E 0PD.

The provisional programme can be accessed here. Registration is via Eventbrite.

For specific dietary or access requirements, please contact the organisers: h.tilley@bbk.ac.uk or fijohnstone@hotmail.com.

CFP: ‘Curating Health: Graphic Medicine and Visual Representations of Illness’, Stockholm

Location: Stockholm University

Date: Mon 3rd – Tues 4th December 2018

The Nordic Network for Gender, Body, Health, in collaboration with the Division for Gender Studies, Stockholm University, presents ‘Curating Health: Graphic Medicine and Visual Representations of Illness’.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Prof. Lisa Diedrich, Stony Brook University
  • Dr. Ian Williams, Manchester Medical School and Graphic Medicine

We invite individual presentations, panel proposals or artistic contributions from across a range of disciplines in the Humanities, Practice Arts, Social Sciences and Biomedicine that engage with the theme of graphic medicine and visual representations of health and illness in all their dimensions. Graphic medicine is one major theme, but proposals may also focus on other forms of (experimental) visual representation in areas such as autobiography and memoir, poster art and display, and visual narratives.

We are particularly interested in papers that address the power differentials of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, crip, queer and ageing.

The deadline for abstract submissions is 15th August 2018. 

Send abstracts of no more than 300 words, including a biography of no more than 100 words, to genderbodyhealth@gmail.com.

The Nordic Network for Gender, Body, Health will celebrate its 10th year with a reception during the conference. The Network is currently based in Sweden but has more than 200 members from across Europe. Previous international conferences and workshops include: Disability, Arts and Health (Bergen); Monitoring the Self (Helsinki); Interrogating Prostheses (Stockholm); Re-imagining Transplantation (Copenhagen).

Please visit our website genderbodyhealth.wordpress.com for further details of past events and the upcoming conference.

CFP: ‘”The Disease of Caring”: Medical Professionals and Activism from the Nineteenth Century to the Present’, London

Date: Friday 26th October 2018

Location: School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

Supported by the Birkbeck/Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund and the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

Keynote speaker: Dr Anne Hanley (Birkbeck)

In In Darkest London (1891), Margaret Harkness’s popular novel about activism to alleviate poverty conditions in late nineteenth-century London, a doctor practising in a slum neighbourhood speaks of the ‘disease of caring’ that prompts him to give medical care to people in need of much wider social change. Harkness herself had trained as a nurse and pharmacist and her medical knowledge continued to inform her activist work throughout her working life. Both her own career and the fictional doctor in her novel reflect how, as medical care became increasingly professionalised over the course of the nineteenth century, discourses of medicine, social influence, and activism also grew interlinked. From the radical revisions of care provision developed by nurses such as Mary Seacole and Florence Nightingale during and after the Crimean War, to the widening of access to safe and effective birth control by activists from Annie Besant to Marie Stopes, to the founding of the NHS, to protests of junior doctors in the present day, the giving of medical care has often been a radical act, and givers of medical care have often allied themselves with a wide range of activist causes. This one-day symposium will aim to create a dialogue between examples and intentions of medical activists historically and in the present day.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers or poster presentations on medical activism in a broad sense. Papers may wish to address the following topics:

  • Equality of care and access to care
  • Conditions for medical work and care-giving, from field hospitals in the Crimean War to present-day hospital crises
  • Personal recognition within the medical profession, from women’s right to practise to demonstrations and strikes of junior doctors
  • Public health, from sanitation projects in the nineteenth century to obesity in the present day
  • Medical care as activism, from slum doctors in the nineteenth century to Médecins sans frontiers
  • The activism of medical professionals in non-medical fields
  • Patient choice and engagement

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to Flore Janssen at activistmedics@gmail.com by Monday 30th July 2018. If your proposal is for a poster presentation, please indicate this clearly. Please include with your abstract a biographical statement of no more than 100 words.

For more information, visit the Disease of Caring website.