PhD Scholarship in Literature and Medicine, Lancaster

Research scholarship in Literature and Medicine and/or Science, University of Lancaster

Number of bursaries: 1
Eligibility: Open to Home/EU and Overseas applicants
Deadline: 2nd March 2018

The Department invites applications for a PhD in English and/or Creative Writing focused upon the relationship between literature and science or literature and medicine from the Early Modern period through to the present.

Topics might include, but are not limited to: the influence of science and/or medicine on novelists and/or poets, or vice versa; literature that challenges or complicates the idea that there are ‘two cultures’ between the arts and the sciences; science or literature as metaphor; popular science writing; the therapeutic effects of writing in terms of bodily or mental well-being; the intersections of science, technology and literature; the Medical Humanities; the use of fiction as the expression or representation of chronic pain; speculative fiction; post-humanism; environmental or eco-critical writing; and drugs and literature. Interdisciplinary projects are strongly welcomed.

The bursary takes the form of a fee waiver for the duration of an individual’s PhD studies and a contribution towards maintenance costs. Applications should be made on the appropriate application form and should be sent to Mrs Leila Atkinson.

Award criteria: The scholarships will be awarded on a competitive basis. Candidates for a scholarship will be ranked based on the following criteria in order of priority:

  1. Potential for an original contribution.
  2. Evidence of scholarly ability:
    – clear and concise description of the study
    – awareness of current literature in the field
    – understanding of research methodology appropriate for an early stage postgraduate student
    – a research project that can be completed within the timeframe allowed for a PhD

The application form is available at http://www.lancaster.ac.uk/english-and-creative-writing/postgraduate/fees-and-funding/. For further information, please contact Professor Sharon Ruston (s.ruston@lancaster.ac.uk).

Screen Seminar: Hannah Hamad, ‘Screening the NHS at 70: Exploring the Political Stakes of Contemporary UK Medical Television’, Glasgow     

Date: 5.30pm – 7pm, Wednesday 6th December

Location: Room 408, Gilmorehill Halls, University of Glasgow

Screen Seminars at Glasgow are delighted that Dr Hannah Hamad (University of Cardiff) will be presenting her work on ‘Screening the NHS at 70: Exploring the Political Stakes of Contemporary UK Medical Television’. All welcome!

‘Screening the NHS at 70: Exploring the Political Stakes of Contemporary UK Medical Television’

In 2018 the NHS is seventy years old. So far the BBC’s most noteworthy gesture towards this has been the nostalgic, reverential and celebrity-oriented television documentary series Matron, Medicine and Me: 70 Years of the NHS (BBC, 2016). The media, including television, have always played a crucial and high-stakes role in making the organisation and its services knowable to the British public, and in negotiating its wavering status as the most seemingly immovable bastion of the UK welfare state. Since its beginnings, the media have functioned as a mouthpiece for government policy and agendas on the National Health Service. But since the immensely controversial passing and implementation of the Health and Social Care Act of 2012, critics like Oliver Huitson have lambasted the news media in particular for their perceived complicity in enabling this to take place with relatively little outcry from either the public or the commentariat. However, as I argue and explicate in this talk, niche outlets and platforms on UK television, even within the mainstream media (e.g. BBC Four’s observational mockumentary sitcom Getting On), have provided audiences and users of the health service with differently oppositional and counter-hegemonic positions on readings and depictions of the NHS under neoliberalism.

Dr Hannah Hamad is Senior Lecturer in Media and Communication at Cardiff University and the author of Postfeminism and Paternity in Contemporary US Film: Framing Fatherhood (New York and London: Routledge, 2013).