CFP: ‘Curating Health: Graphic Medicine and Visual Representations of Illness’, Stockholm

Location: Stockholm University

Date: Mon 3rd – Tues 4th December 2018

The Nordic Network for Gender, Body, Health, in collaboration with the Division for Gender Studies, Stockholm University, presents ‘Curating Health: Graphic Medicine and Visual Representations of Illness’.

Keynote Speakers:

  • Prof. Lisa Diedrich, Stony Brook University
  • Dr. Ian Williams, Manchester Medical School and Graphic Medicine

We invite individual presentations, panel proposals or artistic contributions from across a range of disciplines in the Humanities, Practice Arts, Social Sciences and Biomedicine that engage with the theme of graphic medicine and visual representations of health and illness in all their dimensions. Graphic medicine is one major theme, but proposals may also focus on other forms of (experimental) visual representation in areas such as autobiography and memoir, poster art and display, and visual narratives.

We are particularly interested in papers that address the power differentials of gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, crip, queer and ageing.

The deadline for abstract submissions is 15th August 2018. 

Send abstracts of no more than 300 words, including a biography of no more than 100 words, to genderbodyhealth@gmail.com.

The Nordic Network for Gender, Body, Health will celebrate its 10th year with a reception during the conference. The Network is currently based in Sweden but has more than 200 members from across Europe. Previous international conferences and workshops include: Disability, Arts and Health (Bergen); Monitoring the Self (Helsinki); Interrogating Prostheses (Stockholm); Re-imagining Transplantation (Copenhagen).

Please visit our website genderbodyhealth.wordpress.com for further details of past events and the upcoming conference.

CFP: ‘”The Disease of Caring”: Medical Professionals and Activism from the Nineteenth Century to the Present’, London

Date: Friday 26th October 2018

Location: School of Arts, Birkbeck, University of London

Supported by the Birkbeck/Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund and the Birkbeck Centre for Nineteenth-Century Studies

Keynote speaker: Dr Anne Hanley (Birkbeck)

In In Darkest London (1891), Margaret Harkness’s popular novel about activism to alleviate poverty conditions in late nineteenth-century London, a doctor practising in a slum neighbourhood speaks of the ‘disease of caring’ that prompts him to give medical care to people in need of much wider social change. Harkness herself had trained as a nurse and pharmacist and her medical knowledge continued to inform her activist work throughout her working life. Both her own career and the fictional doctor in her novel reflect how, as medical care became increasingly professionalised over the course of the nineteenth century, discourses of medicine, social influence, and activism also grew interlinked. From the radical revisions of care provision developed by nurses such as Mary Seacole and Florence Nightingale during and after the Crimean War, to the widening of access to safe and effective birth control by activists from Annie Besant to Marie Stopes, to the founding of the NHS, to protests of junior doctors in the present day, the giving of medical care has often been a radical act, and givers of medical care have often allied themselves with a wide range of activist causes. This one-day symposium will aim to create a dialogue between examples and intentions of medical activists historically and in the present day.

We welcome proposals for 20-minute papers or poster presentations on medical activism in a broad sense. Papers may wish to address the following topics:

  • Equality of care and access to care
  • Conditions for medical work and care-giving, from field hospitals in the Crimean War to present-day hospital crises
  • Personal recognition within the medical profession, from women’s right to practise to demonstrations and strikes of junior doctors
  • Public health, from sanitation projects in the nineteenth century to obesity in the present day
  • Medical care as activism, from slum doctors in the nineteenth century to Médecins sans frontiers
  • The activism of medical professionals in non-medical fields
  • Patient choice and engagement

Please submit abstracts of no more than 300 words to Flore Janssen at activistmedics@gmail.com by Monday 30th July 2018. If your proposal is for a poster presentation, please indicate this clearly. Please include with your abstract a biographical statement of no more than 100 words.

For more information, visit the Disease of Caring website.

CFP: Book Proposals, ‘Language, Discourse and Mental Health’, University of Exeter Press

The editors are very pleased to announce the new book series “Language, Discourse and Mental Health” published with the University of Exeter Press. This book series is a unique resource to further knowledge and understanding of mental health from a pluralistically informed linguistic perspective.

Using qualitative and quantitative approaches to language-based analysis, the empirical and theoretical contributions will provide a compelling insight on mental health from a range of perspectives and contexts, including psychotherapeutic communication, public presentations of mental health, literary accounts of lived experiences, and language features associated to specific mental health problems. This interdisciplinary book series will be an essential reference for students, researchers and practitioners in linguistics and communication, education, cognitive science, psychology, counselling and psychotherapy, special needs, medicine, nursing, and medical anthropology.

Scope of the Book Series

The book series is framed in terms of linguistic perspectives that differentiate between communication about mental health (i.e., language performance or use), and the communication of individuals with mental health problems (i.e., language competence or systems) in real-world and research contexts. Such a focus is anticipated to be captured through the following linguistic perspectives: sociolinguistics and sociocultural linguistics, cognitive linguistics and psycholinguistics, literary linguistics and stylistics. These can be applied through a range of language-based methodologies, including qualitative methods (e.g., discourse analysis, conversation analysis, interpretative phenomenological analysis, narrative analysis, thematic analysis), quantitative methods (e.g., corpus-based approaches, quantitative content analysis), and also experimental methods.

Consistent with an interdisciplinary framework that seeks to encourage and strengthen interdisciplinary research of mental health, the book series aims to encompass a wide repertoire different theoretical and philosophical views and a broad range of themes that add significant value to the field of mental health research, including:

  • ‘Understanding of mental health and mental health problems’ by developing empirical and theoretical knowledge of mental health from different perspectives.
  • ‘Living with mental health problems’ by improving understanding of individuals’ perceptions of living with mental health problems.
  • ‘Effective interventions’ by focussing on the effectiveness of psychological intervention in the treatment and prevention of mental health problems.
  • ‘Wider inequalities in society’ (e.g., issues around gender, ethnicity, poverty sexuality and faith).
  • ‘Vulnerable and hard-to-reach populations’ in society, including drug users, migrants and homeless people.

Call for Book Proposals

The book series “Language, Discourse and Mental Health” is accepting book proposals for monographs and edited volumes. To discuss your book proposal, please contact the book series editors,  Dr Laura A. Cariola, Dr Stefan Ecks, Dr Billy Lee, Dr Lisa Mikesell, Dr Anders Nordahl-Hansen. The book series will launch in spring 2019.

Book proposal form: UEP – CE Book Proposal Form 2018 (see also http://www.exeterpress.co.uk/for-authors)

Registration Open: NNMHR Congress, ‘Medical Humanities: Futures’, Leeds

Location: Weetwood Hall, University of Leeds

Date: Thursday 20th – Friday 21st September 2018

The Northern Network for Medical Humanities Research (NNMHR) was founded in 2013 with the purpose of connecting individuals and institutions working in this dynamic area of interdisciplinary research. The network numbers scholars, practitioners, health professionals, artists and health advocates amongst its members and held its first Congress at Durham University in September 2017.

Registration is now open for the second NNMHR Congress, which takes as its theme “Medical Humanities: Futures”. The event will be held at Weetwood Hall at the University of Leeds on Thursday 20 – Friday 21 September 2018. The logic of the Congress is simple: it is an opportunity for people who are passionate or even simply curious about medical humanities research to present their work, share ideas, and meet potential future colleagues and collaborators.

The NNMHR Congress is funded by the Wellcome Trust and is free to attend. Please note that the Congress is not limited to members of the network. All refreshments will be provided, including a Congress dinner on the evening of September 20th. Any questions should be directed to Amelia Defalco at the University of Leeds.

The Congress Hashtag is #NNMHR2018

Registration Open: ‘Texts as Symptoms’ workshop, Bristol

Location: Room 1.05, Wills Memorial Building, Queens Rd, Bristol BS8 1RJ

Date: Monday 9th July 2018

“Texts as Symptoms”, the first workshop in the series “Illness as Fiction: Textual Afflictions in Print and Online“, will take place on 9th July 2018 at the University of Bristol. There will be three presentations in the morning – Sue Vice (Sheffield), Katrina Longhurst (Leeds), and Maria Vaccarella (Bristol) – followed by a collaborative textual analysis session in the afternoon.

Join us if you are interested in factitious illness memoirs or, more in general, in the blurry line between autobiography and fiction!

Attendance is free and lunch will be provided, but places are limited, so please register here.

For dietary and accessibility requirements, please send an email to maria.vaccarella@bristol.ac.uk.

Registration Open: ‘Blood, Sweat, and Tears: Bodily Fluids in the Long Nineteenth Century’, Birmingham

Registration open: Anxious Forms 2018, ‘Blood, Sweat, and Tears: Bodily Fluids in the Long Nineteenth Century’

Date: Friday 27th July 2018

Location: Aston University, Birmingham

‘The power of blood is so difficult to decipher because it is at once the foundational social metaphor and the most basic necessity for life.’

-(Priscilla Wald, foreword of The Cultural Politics of Blood, 1500-1900)

After the success of Anxious Forms: Bodies in Crisis (2014) and Anxious Forms: Masculinities in Crisis (2016), we are pleased to announce a third one-day conference which considers the construction of bodily fluids—both metaphorical and material, both abject and desirable—in the long nineteenth century. The period in question witnessed the first blood transfusion, the first English medical text on menstruation and menopause, anxieties around spermatorrhea and hysteria, the rise of vampire and werewolf fiction, and massive infrastructure reform around sewage and water to combat infectious diseases. This interdisciplinary event will explore the advancements, crises, contradictions, and understandings of bodily fluids in the long nineteenth century across a range of media, including fiction, poetry, drama, journalism, photography, visual arts, material culture, and medical and scientific texts. The event will also explore the challenges of critical discussions of topics traditionally considered taboo or hampered by the dynamics of disgust.

General Registration is open until 15th July and can be found here. All welcome!

Registration fees (before 15 July) are £20 for unwaged scholars and £30 for waged scholars. Registration fees on the day of the conference will be £35 for unwaged scholars and £50 for waged scholars.

Guest Speakers:

Professor Talia Schaffer, CUNY

Talia Schaffer is a professor of English at Queens College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. Her books include Romance’s Rival: Familiar Marriage in Victorian Fiction(2016); Novel Craft: Victorian Domestic Handicraft and Nineteenth-Century Fiction (2011); The Forgotten Female Aesthetes; Literary Culture in Late-Victorian England(2001; a special issue of Victorian Review, with Kelly Hager (2013); Literature and Culture at the Fin de Siècle(2006); an edition of Lucas Malet’s The History of Sir Richard Calmady (2003); Women and British Aestheticism, with Kathy A. Psomiades (1999). She has published widely on Victorian marriage, disability studies, women writers, and material culture, and is currently working on the feminist philosophy of “ethics of care” and Victorian social relations.

Dr Kate Lister, Leeds Trinity University

Dr Kate Lister is a historian, author, lecturer, and the curator of Whores of Yore, a public engagement project that works to make research on sexuality and the history of sex work freely accessible.

Kate is also a columnist for inews where she writes about the history of sex, covering such diverse subjects as medieval impotence tests and the forgotten custom of baking bread with your genitals. As well as her university work, Kate regularly gives talks on the history of sex at events such as the Secret Garden Party, Eroticon, Sexpression, the Edinburgh Fringe festival and the Cheltenham Literature Festival.

She has also published in the field of Victorian studies, film studies, and gender studies, and was awarded the 2017 Sexual Freedom Award, ‘Publicist of the Year’.

 

CFP: ‘Dementia, Violence, and the Politics of Memory in Contemporary Literature, Film, and Comics’, workshop and publication, Berlin

Location: Workshop at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany

Date: 13th – 15th September 2018

Deadline: 13th May 2018

CfP for an edited volume or peer-reviewed special journal issue, preceded by a workshop at Freie Universität Berlin, Germany (Sept. 13-15, 2018).

In public discourse and the day-to-day provision of health care, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia are predominantly regarded as illnesses afflicting individuals. Although diseases of memory can have great impact on relatives, caregivers, and communities, stories of dementia are not necessarily understood as entailing any wider political meaning and it seems common sense not to hold dementia patients accountable for their affliction. At the same time, however (in Western societies at least), memory loss is not always viewed purely as a contingent, ‘neutral’ neurobiological process but can tie into political debates, especially in the context of WW II and the Holocaust but also other experiences of racial/ political violence and trauma, e.g. in the context of colonialism, slavery, genocide, and forced migration in or across Europe, the Americas, and beyond.

In perpetrator societies, dementia-induced amnesia can be interpreted to be a wilful refusal to remember (the neurobiological equivalent of repression), and sufferers might even be blamed for strategically ‘giving in’ to their disease at a specific point in time in order to avoid confrontation with their past. This happened in Germany when Walter Jens, rhetorics professor and influential post-war public intellectual, succumbed to Alzheimer’s at the very moment the media uncovered the facts that he had applied for membership to the NSDAP and published anti-Semitic essays whilst still a student of literature (see Tilman Jens’ 2009 essay Demenz: Abschied von meinem Vater).

In the case of both victims and perpetrators of traumatic injustice and violence, dementia may reveal previously buried or hidden memories (as is imagined in Elie Wiesel’s L’oublié, 1989, Irene Dische’s The Doctor Needs a Home, 1995, Nicole Krauss’ Great House, 2010, or Cécile Wajsbrot’s L’hydre de Lerne, 2011, and David Chariandy’s Soucouyant, 2007). Dementia and amnesia, in these cases, paradoxically reveal rather than conceal uncomfortable truths – in our current cultural moment, given the amount of time that has passed since WW II and the Holocaust, they may do so for the last time. In the context of forced migration, demented protagonists may return to their childhood language and re-enact (traumatic) memories, challenging their status as survivors and their successful integration into their countries of destination (see e.g. Bernlef’s 1984 novel Hersenschimmen).

Memory theorists and cultural studies scholars have raised the fact that our memory culture will change once the last eyewitnesses of 20th century catastrophes have died – communicative memory will turn into cultural memory, to put it in Jan Assmann’s terms. Should the increasing focus on protagonists with dementia in recent books and films be understood as related to this development? Is dementia in these contexts a simple plot device, is the illness depicted realistically, and/ or is it used as a metaphor to raise
larger cultural and socio-political issues? How do literary texts, films, or comics conceptualise the dynamics of remembering and forgetting and the interrelations between ‘real’, repressed, re/imagined memories, or those (un)covered by screen memories? What are the political repercussions and the larger cultural impact of these works? What kind(s) of ‘truth’ do they propose; what is at stake when dementia meets history and politics?

We invite previously unpublished papers from scholars from various disciplines, such as literary, film and comics studies, history, cultural studies, at all career stages, from postgraduates to senior academics. Contributions should be written in English and focus on literary texts, films, or comics (from any cultural context). Workshop participants will receive funding to cover travel and accommodation expenses. The
2018 workshop may be followed by another meeting of contributing authors in 2019.

We hope that the workshop discussions in September 2018 will incite resonance in speakers’ papers to result in the production of a high-quality publication. The final articles should be about 7000 words long and will be due in spring 2019.

Workshop convenors/ volume editors:

  • Irmela Marei Krüger-Fürhoff (Freie Universität Berlin)
  • Nina Schmidt (Freie Universität Berlin)
  • Sue Vice (University of Sheffield)

Please send your English-language abstract of max. 300 words by 13th May 2018 to:
i.krueger-fuerhoff@fu-berlin.de.

The workshop is organised by the PathoGraphics research team at Freie Universität Berlin, Friedrich Schlegel Graduate School of Literary Studies: www.fsgs.fu-berlin.de/pathographics.

PhD Scholarship: ‘Enabling or Disabling? Critical responses to new audio technologies in the early 20th century’, Leeds

Location: School of Philosophy, Religion & History of Science, University of Leeds

Closing Date: 5pm Friday 1st June 2018

Funder: White Rose College of the Arts and Humanities (WROCAH)

Enabling or Disabling? Critical responses to new audio technologies in the early 20th century

Supervisors: Graeme Gooday (University of Leeds), and Esme Cleall (University of Sheffield).

Our preliminary descriptor for this project is as follows; this will be developed in the first six months of the PhD award via a comprehensive, guided literature review:

New media technologies have not always brought universal benefits. Some indeed have had distinctly disabling effects on social participation and communication. This project looks at the challenges created by the new aural technologies of telephone, radio and ‘talkie’ movies that added to the soundscapes of British life for many by World War 2. While some of the blind population could access the new ‘spoken word’ culture of radio through the British Wireless for the Blind Fund founded in 1928, these aural innovations excluded Deaf people and made participation problematic for hard of hearing people. Numerous hearing aid manufacturers marketed a new generation of electronic devices as a technical fix for the challenges involved, but the experiences of many who tried to use these hearing aids, and the controversies around the advertising of them, has never been fully documented. The PhD student on this project would be invited to explore any aspects that interested them in the broader historical context of differentiated experiences of audio technologies. Available research resources include the Action on Hearing Loss Library, which holds both the archives of the National Institute for the Deaf, its records of regional Hard of Hearing Clubs and the journals of various deaf organisations. Materials on the testing and advertising of hearing aids are available at BT ArchivesThe British Post Museum and Archive and the History of Advertising Trust in Norfolk.

For further information please contact:

Application Closing Date: 5pm Friday 1 June. Interviews have been provisionally scheduled for 4 July 2018.

How to apply:

Application is in two parts. An application cannot be considered unless BOTH PARTS are complete.

You must apply for a place of study at the University of Leeds, School of Philosophy, Religion & History of Science. If you have not done this yet, you can do this here
http://www.leeds.ac.uk/info/130206/applying/91/applying_for_research_degrees

White Rose Studentship Application Form: http://bit.ly/wrocah2018nwapp
If you have any queries about completing the online application form, please contact the WRoCAH Office on networks@wrocah.ac.uk

Applicant Requirements

Applicants must:

  • Have at least a UK Upper Second Class Honours degree or equivalent. A Masters degree is desirable, or demonstration of equivalent experience.
  • Demonstrate a desire to participate fully in the ‘Electronic Soundscapes’ network and its activities.
  • Demonstrate a desire to engage with and benefit from the full WRoCAH cohort of students from across the three White Rose Universities (c. 80 students) at the same stage in their research, in a shared training and development programme.

Terms and Conditions

Each WRoCAH White Rose Networks Studentship is tenable for three years and students are expected to start in October 2018. As the coherence of the network is important, deferrals will not be permitted.

The award will provide fees at the Home/EU rate and a stipend paid at standard Research Council rates (£14,777) for the first year of study. The award is renewable for a second and third year of study subject to satisfactory academic progress according to each institution’s Policy on Research Degrees.

Successful students will also be eligible to apply to additional WRoCAH funding schemes for research support, training, student-led activities and knowledge exchange projects. All students will be required to spend one month with an external Partner organisation on a specific project to develop their employability skills.

McCarthy Award for History of Medicine Research, Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

Awarding Body: Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh

Deadline: 31st August 2018

The Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh has set up an annual award for history of medicine research, specifically focused on the history of Scottish medicine. The purpose of this award is to support and develop the study of the history of medicine in Scotland. The prize for this award is £500.

Eligibility

This award is open to all researchers in the history of medicine, or related social and cultural history fields. Researchers can be based in the United Kingdom or overseas. Please be aware that for overseas finalists, travel expenses to the event will only be paid from their point of entry into the United Kingdom.

Application and Selection Procedure

Research must be unpublished and must have been undertaken in the last 3 years. Research which has been submitted for publication will be considered, but details should be given of when and where it has been submitted, and if it has been accepted for publication. Abstracts must be based on original research in the field.

The deadline for submissions is 31 August 2018. Abstracts must be submitted in either PDF or Word format along with a completed application form and curriculum vitae. The abstract must not exceed 1000 words in length. The curriculum vitae must not exceed two sides of A4. Applicants, if chosen, must be willing to present their research on Friday 19 October 2018. This is a public event, to encourage engagement with the history of medicine in Scotland.

The Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh will publish the winning paper. The winner will also be asked to submit a guest blog post on their research for publication on the College’s heritage blog.
The award can only be awarded to an individual once.

The application form an be downloaded at https://www.rcpe.ac.uk/college/mccarthy-award-history-medicine-research.

Registration: ‘Representing Pain: Narrative & Fragments Symposium’, Lancaster

Location: Lancaster University

Date: 9am – 5.30pm, Friday 17th August 2018

This Symposium is part of the AHRC-funded research network Translating Chronic Painwhich is exploring challenges pain experience poses to traditional narrative representation, and the value of rethinking narrativity or embracing unconventional or fragmentary narrative forms. The symposium will explore broad debates around narrativity in medical humanities, the potential of short-form narration or unconventional forms of illness narration, the positivity imperative in illness narration, challenges of chronic pain representation, and the way ‘entanglements’ with fields such as disability studies or trauma theory may enrich critical medical humanities approaches to these questions.

Speakers include Dr Angela Woods (Durham), Dr Stella Bolaki (Kent), Dr James Berger (Yale), Dr Megan Crowley-Matoka (Northwestern), Professor Ann Jurecic (Rutgers), Professor Brendan Stone (Sheffield), and Professor Javier Moscoso (Professor of History and Philosophy of Science, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, Spain).

This Translating Chronic Pain network brings together people living with pain, academics, and pain charities to explore how short-form creative writing may support people living with pain, raise awareness, and enhance healthcare training.

Travel and accommodation bursaries are also available for six postgraduate students or early career researchers.

For more information please visit the project website or email Sara Wasson.