Archive for April, 2014

  1. Second CFP: Disability, Prostheses and Patenting (University of Leeds)

    Posted on April 28th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Disability, Prostheses and Patenting

    University of Leeds, 18th-19th September 2014

    Thanks to the AHRC we have funding to support speakers’ travel and accommodation expenses both in the UK and internationally, prompting a second call for papers.

     
    By the end of the nineteenth century, an industry built around prosthetic appliances – hearing aids, spectacles, walking sticks and specialist furniture – flourished across the industrial world.  Much historical work to date has been conducted on the significant effect of the American Civil War and the First World War on the rise of prosthesis production and usage in Europe and the USA (Ott, Serlin & Mihm, 2002<http://nyupress.org/books/book-details.aspx?bookId=7884#.UzrQkxy9fnI>). Yet, we are still some way from understanding the relationship between physical impairment and commerce and the ways in which the commodification of disability during this period and beyond affected everyday life and health. At least some of this production operated independently of the medical system since not all disabled groups were medicalized nor did all inventors developed assistive devices under the jurisdiction of clinical professionals.  Nonetheless, this increase in production was often linked to systems of patenting. The study of patented devices for disability support therefore provides us with ways to uncover trade/user
    relationships, as well as a way of assessing meanings and conceptions of disability more holistically – especially for those cases in which disabled groups themselves took the initiative in patenting activity.

    Your proposal should address at least one of the following themes, covering any historical period:

    1. What sorts of appliances (patented or unpatented) were used by people with disabilities to manage their condition? Most studies have focused on artificial limbs but we need to open up the field to include other prostheses such as breasts, dentures, ears, larynxes, noses and penises but also other appliances such as hearing aids, wheelchairs and furniture (Ott, Serlin & Mihm, 2002 <http://nyupress.org/books/book-details.aspx?bookId=7884#.UzrQkxy9fnI>). Analyses of more inclusive sets of aids should also be compared to other everyday objects, such as furniture.
    1. What sorts of relationships can be adduced between consumption, production and patenting both in the UK and globally? Appliance manufacturers certainly seemed to patent their devices more regularly than for other medical items but how and why did this vary between appliances? Were manufacturers who were themselves disabled, or had people with disabilities among their relatives, particularly prominent in the use of patents to protect their appliances from plagiarism or infringement proceedings by rivals? Examples might include hearing aids (the Amplivox collection at the Thackray Museum in Leeds), prosthetic limbs (numerous examples from the US Civil War and subsequent conflicts) wheelchairs, and improvements to Braille. How far were medical practitioners involved with these developments? Were prosthetic appliances seen as occupying a kind of non-medical domain for which patenting was acceptable?
    1. How did war affect patenting activity of such appliances? Lisa Herschbach, for example, has demonstrated the dramatic increase in the registration of patents in America following the Civil War and others have examined similar trends in facial reconstruction after WW1, but was this the case elsewhere and for other appliances? (Herschbach 1997<http://www.jstor.org/stable/4289518>).
    1. How did the gendered nature of appliances affect patenting activity? Most studies of artificial limbs and facial reconstruction are almost always exclusively male because they focus on industrial works and primarily, soldiers, but how far did women also play a role in the patenting and marketing of such appliances?

    If you wish to participate, please send a paper proposal (300 words maximum) to rethinkingpatentcultures@gmail.com by Friday 2nd May. Further enquiries about topic and the scope of papers are welcomed.

  2. Conference: ‘Learning Disability Studies in Academia: Challenging Attitudes, Changing Lives’ (Manchester)

    Posted on April 23rd, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    A free conference at the University of Manchester, 9th June, 10am-4pm.

    Following the recent cases of death and abuse of learning disabled people and in particular the preventable death of Connor Sparrowhawk (LB), this conference will ask:

    • How can Learning Disability Studies make a real difference to the lives of learning disabled people?
    • How can Learning Disability Studies take more of an active role in challenging abuse and improving professional practice?
    • How can universities become more inclusive of learning disabled people and their views and expertise?

    Keynote Speakers: Dr. Sara Ryan (by video link), Connor’s mother and the Partnership Steering Group, Learning Disability Studies. Other speakers include Prof. Dan Goodley, Dr. Katherine Runswick-Cole, and Dr. Andrea Hollomotz.

    The conference is aimed at academics, practitioners, learning disability activists, learning disabled people, family members, carers and students.

    This conference is held in support of the Justice for LB campaign. Twitter @JusticeforLB and #107days hashtag.

    To get details and book your place e-mail learningdisabilitystudiesmanchester@outlook.com

  3. CFP: ‘Disease, Disability and Medicine in Medieval Europe’ (University of Nottingham)

    Posted on April 15th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Disease, Disability and Medicine in Medieval Europe
    6th-7th December 2014
    University of Nottingham

    This year’s event focuses on infectious diseases and long term sickness and is co-hosted with the ‘Homo Debilis’ Creative unit at the University of Bremen. The conference will be preceded by a Graduate Workshop on medieval disability on 5th December which is free for all Graduates with an interest in disability studies.

    We are inviting papers on the impact, description, detection and causes of infectious diseases in all areas of medieval health and wellbeing and we are particularly interested in papers that consider a cross-disciplinary approach between the medieval and other periods.

    Please send abstracts (no more than 200 words) and any queries about the workshop to Dr Christina Lee by 15th August 2014. The registration page will open shortly (check here for more details)

  4. CFP: Anxious Forms: Bodies in Crisis in Victorian Literature and Culture (University of Glasgow)

    Posted on April 14th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    22nd August 2014 – The University of Glasgow

    Anxious Forms is a one-day interdisciplinary conference which seeks to engage with the Victorian era as a period of anxiety manifested in physical form, be it the human body, national, ideological, and scientific bodies, or literary and artistic forms. Recent criticism of the long nineteenth century has viewed the period as one of crisis: a collection of critical moments which are framed as decisive, paradigmatic shifts. Criticism frequently considers the physical manifestations of anxieties surrounding industrial progress, imperial expansion, and scientific and medical advancements, as well as shifting concepts of gender, religion, race, class, and sexuality.

    However, some scholars have started to question the basis of such a reading, asking to what extent this is a contemporary application of the concept of ‘anxiety’. This conference intends to open up this debate and stimulate discussion across disciplines.

    Confirmed speakers include:

    • Dr Nicholas Daly (University College Dublin)
    • Dr Christine Ferguson (University of Glasgow)
    • Dr Megan Coyer (University of Glasgow)

    Through this conference we wish to highlight the University of Glasgow as a major centre for multidisciplinary Victorian research and intend this to be the first annual nineteenth-century conference hosted by the University, with an accompanying published collection of papers.

    Topics for papers might include, but are not limited to:

    • Bodies of publication
    • Narrative forms
    • Identity crises
    • Objectified, pornographic or voyeuristic bodies
    • Spiritual, supernatural, and spectral bodies
    • Bodies of commodification and consumption
    • Bodies politic, national and foreign bodies
    • Environmental, geological and archeological bodies
    • Medicine and the medical humanities
    • Biological, mechanical, and prosthetic bodies
    • Forms of cartography and travel writing
    • Art, illustration, film and photography
    • Collected and classified bodies
    • Neo-Victorianism
    • Bodies of knowledge

    We welcome proposals from postgraduate and early career researchers, as well as from more established academics. Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words for 20-minute conference papers, together with an academic CV, toarts-anxiousforms2014@glasgow.ac.uk by 15th May 2014. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of the following week.

    The conference is free to attend for both speakers and non-speakers; please contact us (Abigail Boucher and Alexandra Foulds at arts-anxiousforms2014@glasgow.ac.uk) to register.

  5. Postdoc, History of Neuroscience and Psychiatry (Calgary)

    Posted on April 8th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Postdoctoral Scholar Position

    Area: History of Medicine (history of neuroscience & psychiatry)
    Duration: 2 Years (potential for 3rd year)
    Start Date: September 1, 2014
    Salary: Commensurate with Experience

    The Department of Community Health Sciences in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Calgary is accepting applications for a Postdoctoral Fellow in the History of Neuroscience & Psychiatry for a research project funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR).

    Job Description:
    The UofC has an active research and educational community in the wider field of the science studies (programs in the History of Medicine and Health Care, History and Philosophy of Science, as well as Science and Technology Studies).  The successful applicant will work with a team of historians and science scholars based in the Faculty of Medicine with strong links to the Faculties of Arts/Science/Nursing, the Calgary Institute for the Humanities, the Hotchkiss Brain Institute, and the Institute for Public Health.  The applicant will help to advance the groups’ historiographical research program and engage with (inter)national collaborators to examine the impact of émigrés physicians and researchers in North American neuroscience.  The research program is aligned with current work to investigate the impact of the forced migration of German-speaking émigré psychiatrists, neurologists and basic brain researchers in Canada and the USA (see: www.homhcp.ucalgary.ca).

    The successful candidate will teach 1 course per term in an area related to the History of Medicine/History/History and Philosophy of Science and contribute 40% of her/his time to research, data-banking, and publication activities of the research program.  Participation in the ongoing seminars and lecture series of the program is also required.  All other time, she/he can devote to her/his grant-writing activities, publications, and collaborations.

    Qualifications:
    Applications are invited from recent PhD graduates (<3 years from degree) in history/sociology/STS/ philosophy/anthropology/classics with a demonstrated background in history of medicine/science/neuroscience and interest in the subject of the local research program.  International applications are likewise strongly encouraged. Data-banking experience and additional knowledge of German, Hebrew, Polish, or French is appreciated; and demonstrated experiences with oral history methodology would be an advantage.

    Application details:
    Review of applications will begin April-30, 2014 continuing until successful recruitment (anticipated start date: Sept-1, 2014).  Applicants should submit a CV, a cover letter with statement of research experience, 2 writing samples (articles or books chapters), a brief outline of personal research interests along with 2 reference letters to:

    Dr. Frank W. Stahnisch, Associate Professor
    AMF/Hannah Professorship in the History of Medicine and Health Care
    Department of Community Health Sciences & Department of History
    TRW Building, Room 3E41, 3280 Hospital Drive NW
    Calgary, AB, Canada  T2N 4Z6

    Email applications (with all supporting materials) are preferred.  Applicants wishing more information are encouraged to contact Dr. Frank W. Stahnisch (fwstahni@ucalgary.ca) or Mrs. Beth Cusitar (bcusitar@ucalgary.ca).

  6. Autism and Ethics Conference, National Autistic Society (Inverness)

    Posted on April 8th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Autism and Ethics conference Friday May 16th 2014

    Doors open 9am for 9.20 am start, finishes 4.45pm

    Smithton Church, Murray Road, Inverness. IV2 7YU

    ARGH (Autism Rights Group Highland), in partnership with the National Autistic Society Scotland are delighted to be holding an Autism and Ethics conference from the Autistic perspective; all the main speakers at this conference are Autistic. With thanks to The Highland Health and Social Care partnership for supporting this event.

    Chair: Kabie Brook (Chair, ARGH: Autism Rights Group Highland), co-chair Mark Lever (Chief Executive, the National Autistic Society).

    Presentations will include:

    • Dr. Wendy Lawson: ‘Autism spectrum conditions (ASC), ethics and issues of gender.’
    • Dr. Dinah Murray: ‘Ethical Ethics.’
    • Dr. Yo Dunn: ‘Meaningful involvement in organising our own support – ethical issues.’
    • Damian Milton: ‘So what exactly are autism interventions, intervening with?’
    • Larry Arnold: ‘Doing ethics the university way, is it enough?’

    We have chosen autism and ethics as the theme for this conference. Ethics is not just about theory: ethical concerns directly affect the down-to-earth everyday lives of Autistic people and their families, and the practitioners who work with us. Ethics is central to today’s person centred approaches that focus on quality of life and personal empowerment, as well as to best practice in research. This conference aims to step away from theory and achieve a practical understanding of what ethics in relation to autism practice really means. We hope to promote discussion and build bridges between attendees from across the autism community. This is a unique opportunity for parents, carers, Autistic people, practitioners, researchers and others to hear Autistic people speaking as experts in their field and to promote discussion and networking with the other attendees. We would also like to give the chance for reflection and strengthening of identity and networks to Autistic people on their own terms.

    Expected audience: Autistic people, parents, paid and unpaid carers, practitioners, researchers, other professionals and the general public.

    What to expect if you come along: Lunch is provided, there will be breaks throughout the day and a quiet room will be available.

    Cost: £25 (reduced rate of £12.50 for people on out of work benefits / income support).

    How to book: send payment, (postal order, or cheque made payable to ‘Autism Rights Group Highland’), a stamped addressed envelope for return of tickets, phone number or email address and a note of how many tickets you require at which rate, plus any access requirements including dietary requirements if relevant to: 22 Wester Inshes Place, Inverness, IV2 5HZ.

    For payment online and more information, see www.arghighland.co.uk

    Note: unfortunately we have to charge additional fees for online payment.

    ARGH members should contact us direct before booking.

    Enquiries: info@arghighland.co.uk

  7. Conference, ‘Better with a Book: Exploring the Relationship between Literature and Mental Health’ (London)

    Posted on April 8th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    The Reader Organisation’s National Conference 2014
    ‘Better with a Book: Exploring the Relationship between Literature and Mental Health’

    9am-4.30pm, Thursday 15th May 2014
    British Library Conference Centre, Euston Road, London, NW1 2DB

    “Shared reading is one of the most significant developments to have taken place in mental health practice in the last ten years.”

    Dr David Fearnley, Medical Director, Mersey Care NHS Trust

    The Reader Organisation’s fifth annual national conference will explore how their shared reading model uses literature to improve mental health, reduce social isolation and enhance quality of life.

    Academic research into The Reader Organisation’s projects has demonstrated statistically significant improvements in the mental health of those suffering mild to moderate depression, reduced agitation for those suffering with dementia, and improved emotional, social and educational wellbeing for women in prison.

    A recent evaluation report calculated that every £1 invested in shared reading generates an average social return of £6.47.

    Shared reading groups currently take place every week in health, criminal justice, community, and education settings across the UK, providing individuals with the tools to transform their relationship to themselves and one another.

    This conference offers an opportunity for commissioners, practitioners and professionals from all sectors to examine the impact of shared reading on individuals, communities and organisations.

    Programme information

    Confirmed speakers include:

    • Lord Melvyn Bragg, writer, broadcaster, and former President of MIND, sharing his personal reading experiences.
    • Lord Alan Howarth, Co-Chair All Party Parliamentary Group for Arts, Health and Wellbeing, Nick Benefield,former Joint Head of the NHS and NOMS Offender Personality Disorder Implementation Programme, and Lord David Ramsbotham, former HM Chief Inspector of Prisons, discussing the effect of shared reading in secure mental health settings.
    • Baroness Estelle Morris, former Secretary of State for Education, and Dr Alice Sullivan, Institute for Education, discussing the role of reading in schools
    • Professor Philip Davis and Dr Josie Billington, the Centre for Research into Reading, Information and Linguistic Systems at the University of Liverpool, presenting the findings of their AHRC study into the cultural value of shared reading.

     

    Booking information

    Full day delegate, including lunch and refreshments – £140

    Book your place online: http://readerorganisationconference.eventbrite.co.uk

    Alternatively, contact Abigail Leader for information on paying by cheque or invoice: abigailleader@thereader.org.uk or call 0151 207 7221

    Find out more: www.thereader.org.uk/events/conference
    Follow @thereaderorg, #betterwithabook for the latest updates.

  8. New Book Series: Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine

    Posted on April 2nd, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

     

     

    Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine
    Edited by Sharon Ruston, Alice Jenkins, and Catherine Belling

    Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine is an exciting new series that focuses on one of the most vibrant and interdisciplinary areas in literary studies: the intersection of literature, science and medicine. Comprised of academic monographs, essay collections, and Palgrave Pivot books, the series will emphasize a historical approach to its subjects, in conjunction with a range of other theoretical approaches. The series will cover all aspects of this rich and varied field and is open to new and emerging topics as well as established ones.

    About the editors:

    Sharon Ruston is a Chair in Romanticism and Research Director for the Department of English and Creative Writing at Lancaster University, UK. She sits on the Executive Committee for the British Society of Science and Literature.

    Alice Jenkins is a Professor of Victorian Literature and Culture at Glasgow University, UK. She is also a co-founder and former chair of the British Society of Science and Literature.

    Catherine Belling is an Associate Professor in Medical Humanities and Bioethics at Northwestern University, USA. She is also the Executive Editor of the journal ‘Literature and Medicine’.

    Call for proposals: For information about submitting a Palgrave Studies in Literature, Science and Medicine proposal, please contact: Ben Doyle, or Catherine Belling, or Sharon Ruston, or Brigitte Shull, or Alice Jenkins.

  9. Seminar: ‘Crip Displacements: Voices of Disability, Neoliberalism, and Resistance’ (Liverpool Hope University)

    Posted on April 1st, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Crip Displacements: Voices of Disability, Neoliberalism, and Resistance

    Prof. Robert McRuer

    Date: Tuesday 15th July 2014

    Time: 2.15pm–3.45pm

    Place: Eden 109, Liverpool Hope University, UK

    Theorists of neoliberalism, from David Harvey to Judith Butler and Athena Athanasiou, have placed dispossession and displacement at the center of their analyses of the workings of contemporary global capitalism.  Disability, however, has not figured centrally into these analyses.  This presentation attends to crip echoes generated by dispossession, displacement, and a global austerity politics.  Centering on British-Mexican relations during a moment of austerity in the UK and gentrification in Mexico, “Crip Displacements” identifies both the voices of disability that are recognized by and made useful for neoliberalism as well as those shut down or displaced by this dominant economic and cultural system.  Prof. McRuer particularly focuses on two events from 2013: a British embassy good will event touting access in Mexico City and an installation of photographs by Livia Radawanski, from the same period.  Radwanski’s photos of the redevelopment of a Mexico City neighborhood (and the displacement of poor people living in the neighborhood) are examined in order to attend to the ways in which disability might productively haunt theories of neoliberal dispossession.

    Robert McRuer is Professor of English and Chair of the Department of English at George Washington University.  He is the author or editor of numerous books and articles, including Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability (NYU Press, 2006) and Sex and Disability (edited with Anna Mollow, Duke University Press, 2012). He is also a JLCDS editorial board member.

    This seminar is part of the CCDS series, The Voice of Disability, which will continue in the new academic year.

    For further information please contact:

    Dr. David Bolt

    Senior Lecturer, Education and Disability Studies, http://www.hope.ac.uk/staff/boltd.html

  10. CFP: Disability, Prostheses & Patenting (University of Leeds)

    Posted on April 1st, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Disability, Prostheses and Patenting

    University of Leeds, 18th-19th September 2014

    An international workshop supported by the AHRC Network grant: Rethinking Patent Cultures

    Thanks to the AHRC we have funding to support speakers’ travel and accommodation expenses both in the UK and internationally.

    By the end of the nineteenth century, an industry built around prosthetic appliances – hearing aids, spectacles, walking sticks and specialist furniture – flourished across the industrial world.  Much historical work to date has been conducted on the significant effect of the American Civil War and the First World War on the rise of prosthesis production and usage in Europe and the USA (Ott, Serlin & Mihm 2002). Yet, we are still some way from understanding the relationship between physical impairment and commerce and the ways in which the commodification of disability during this period and beyond affected everyday life and health. At least some of this production operated independently of the medical system since not all disabled groups were medicalized nor did all inventors developed assistive devices under the jurisdiction of clinical professionals.  Nonetheless, this increase in production was often linked to systems of patenting. The study of patented devices for disability support therefore provides us with ways to uncover trade/user relationships, as well as a way of assessing meanings and conceptions of disability more holistically – especially for those cases in which disabled groups themselves took the initiative in patenting activity.

    Your proposal should address at least one of the following themes, covering any historical period:

    i) What sorts of appliances (patented or unpatented) were used by people with disabilities to manage their condition? Most studies have focused on artificial limbs but we need to open up the field to include other prostheses such as breasts, dentures, ears, larynxes, noses and penises but also other appliances such as hearing aids, wheelchairs and furniture (Ott, Serlin & Mihm 2002). Analyses of more inclusive sets of aids should also be compared to other everyday objects, such as furniture.

    ii) What sorts of relationships can be adduced between consumption, production and patenting both in the UK and globally? Appliance manufacturers certainly seemed to patent their devices more regularly than for other medical items but how and why did this vary between appliances? Were manufacturers who were themselves disabled, or had people with disabilities among their relatives, particularly prominent in the use of patents to protect their appliances from plagiarism or infringement proceedings by rivals? Examples might include hearing aids (the Amplivox collection at the Thackray Museum in Leeds), prosthetic limbs (numerous examples from the US Civil War and subsequent conflicts) wheelchairs, and improvements to Braille. How far were medical practitioners involved with these developments? Were prosthetic appliances seen as occupying a kind of non-medical domain for which patenting was acceptable?

    iii) How did war affect patenting activity of such appliances? Lisa Herschbach, for example, has demonstrated the dramatic increase in the registration of patents in America following the Civil War and others have examined similar trends in facial reconstruction after WW1, but was this the case elsewhere and for other appliances? (Herschbach 1997).

    iv) How did the gendered nature of appliances affect patenting activity? Most studies of artificial limbs and facial reconstruction are almost always exclusively male because they focus on industrial works and primarily, soldiers, but how far did women also play a role in the patenting and marketing of such appliances?

    If you wish to participate, please send a paper proposal (300 words maximum) to Claire Jones by Friday 2nd May. Further enquiries about topic and the scope of papers are welcomed.

    Dr Claire L. Jones

    Director of the Museum of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine

    School of Philosophy, Religion and History of Science

    Woodhouse Lane, University of Leeds

    Leeds, LS2 9JT