3 PhD Studentships in Health Inequalities, University of Durham

The University of Durham is offering three fully-funded PhD Studentship in Health Inequalities, available from October 2014. All three are attached to the “Health Inequalities in an Age of Austerity Project”. 

The deadline for applications is 2nd April 2014

About the project:

Applications are invited for three fully-funded three-year doctoral studentships as part of a large 5 year research project funded by the Leverhulme Trust. The project aims to provide a contemporary and innovative, theoretically informed, comprehensive, interdisciplinary, mixed methods intensive case study of the aetiology and experience of health inequalities in Stockton on Tees, North East England.

Please see the project website for further details: http://www.dur.ac.uk/health.inequalities/.

Studentship 1: Women, Health and Austerity

We are looking for candidates in the areas of health and wider socio economic inequalities. The candidate will explore the lived experiences of austerity through in-depth longitudinal qualitative interviews with a sub-sample of approximately 25 women whose formal income is identified as being largely or solely derived from welfare benefits. Their experiences of austerity in terms of health and wellbeing, service use and access, income and benefit receipt, housing, unemployment, caring responsibilities, as well as coping mechanisms, will all be explored.

Applicants should be outstanding graduates (with a minimum 2.1 undergraduate degree; Masters desirable) in the social sciences, namely social geography, sociology, social policy, social anthropology, social psychology or public health with a particular interest/experience in qualitative methodology, fieldwork and analysis.

The project will be supervised by Professor Clare Bambra, Professor Linda McKie (School of Applied Social Sciences) and Dr Kayleigh Garthwaite. This PhD project will link into the main Leverhulme Health Inequalities project as well as complementing the work of several other PhDs and researchers working on social and health geography at Durham University. The student must be able to work independently, including the production of their own and co-authored papers, but will also be expected to contribute to the wider project.

Full details can be found here: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AIH595/phd-studentship-women-health-and-austerity/.

Studentship 2: History, Health and Austerity

We are looking for candidates who are interested in pursuing doctoral research in the historical aspects of austerity and health. It will therefore involve detailed library, archival and desk-based social historical research to build up a ‘biography of place’ and to examine parallels between health, austerity and recession now and in the past. The impact of 20thcentury economic, industrial, cultural, social policies and medical and health history of the area will all be examined. We would expect the research to be supplemented by face to face qualitative interviews with local stakeholders such as community leaders, local health care, local authority and welfare professionals to gauge an overview of the more recent policy history of the area.

Applicants should be outstanding graduates (with a minimum 2.1 undergraduate degree; Masters desirable) in social/medical history or a relevant social science (with demonstrable historical content), namely human geography, sociology, political science, social policy, social anthropology, social psychology, or public health or social anthropology, with a particular interest in historical analysis and/or qualitative research/policy analysis. The project will be supervised by Prof Clare Bambra, Dr Andrzej Olechnowicz, and Dr Gordon MacLeod. The student must be able to work independently, but will also be expected to contribute to the wider project including co-authoring PhD and project papers.

Full details can be found here: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AIH592/studentship-history-health-and-austerity/.

Studentship 3: Health, Place and Austerity

We are looking for candidates who are interested in pursuing doctoral research in the areas of health and socio-economic inequalities. Candidates will be expected to use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to spatially analyse routine and existing survey data (e.g. Hospital Episodes Statistics, Census, mortality data, Marmot Indicators, Index of Multiple Deprivation Health Dimension etc). You will spatially analyse the relationship between health and the wider social (e.g. housing type, income, education), service (e.g. health care centres, community centres, fast food and alcohol outlets, green space, leisure facilities) and economic (e.g. local unemployment rate, benefit receipt, deprivation, house repossessions, business start-ups/failures, travel to work data, and local authority GDP) environments in Stockton-on-Tees. A longitudinal and historical element to the spatial mapping will enable any changes in the local context and health indicators to be detected.

Applicants should be outstanding graduates (minimum 2:1 undergraduate degree, masters desirable) of health/social geography, social sciences or public health, with a particular interest in GIS, quantitative data and statistical analysis. The project will be supervised by Prof Clare Bambra, Dr Alison Copeland and Dr Christine Dunn.

This PhD project will link into the main Leverhulme Health Inequalities project as well as complementing the work of several other PhDs and researchers working on social and health geography at Durham University. The student must be able to work independently, but will also be expected to contribute to the wider project including co-authoring PhD and project papers.

Full details can be found here: http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AIH589/phd-studentship-3-health-place-and-austerity/.

If you have any questions about any part of the application process please contact the admissions office (geog.pgadmissions@durham.ac.uk).

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *