Archive for January, 2014

  1. CFP: Body Transformations, Oxford

    Posted on January 31st, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    3rd Global Conference: Body Transformations

    Saturday 30th August – Monday 1st September 2014
    Mansfield College, Oxford, United Kingdom

    Call for Presentations:

    Is our body our own or are we owned by our body? From the millisecond we are conceived we are whole. Made out of around 100 trillion cells and (maybe) one soul. Our body is our first partner, our first ally, and sometimes our greatest foe. No other creature is as complex as the human being. Our capability to use tools, record history, and perform are unparalleled by any other being inhabiting this earth. This conference aims to discuss the body in all its glory and all its gore. The 3rd Body and Transformation Conference seeks to explore the many layers and levels of bodies, and the ways in which bodies can transform and shift. We want to explore the whole array of bodily functions, stations, failures, alterations, concepts, abilities and disabilities, and awarenesses external and internal.

    We welcome a variety of presentation formats:

    • papers, panels, workshops, reports
    • case studies
    • performance pieces; dramatic readings; poetic renditions; short stories; creative writings
    • works of art; works of music

    We are particularly interested in presentations that explore the physicality of existence, including, but not limited to:

    • The physicality of change, such as aging, shapeshifting, reconstructive surgery, transplants, hybridity, death and dying, genetic manipulation, abilities and disabilities, and growth, mutants (and perhaps even superheroes).
    • Race, sex, and gender, including issues of bio-identity, transgender identity, virginity, desire, pleasure, and asexuality.
    • Embodiment and disembodiment, including animate and inanimate bodies, avatars, the metaphysical, spirit and the body, liminality, solitude and companionship.
    • Body horror, including parasites, wounds and injury, infection and contagion, the politics of bio-power, pain, abjection, and violence.

    Presentations, performances and papers will be accepted which deal with related areas and themes. The Steering Group particularly welcomes the submission of pre-formed panel proposals.

    In order to support and encourage interdisciplinarity engagement, it is our intention to create the possibility of starting dialogues between the parallel events running during this conference. Delegates are welcome to attend up to two sessions in each of the concurrent conferences. We also propose to produce cross-over sessions between these groups and we welcome proposals which deal with the relationship between Sport and Bodily Transformations.

    What to Send:

    300 word abstracts should be submitted by Friday 4th April 2014. If an abstract is accepted for the conference, a full draft paper should be submitted by Friday 11th July 2014. Abstracts should be submitted simultaneously to both Organising Chairs; abstracts may be in Word or RTF formats with the following information and in this order:
    a) author(s), b) affiliation as you would like it to appear in programme, c) email address, d) title of proposal, e) body of proposal, f) up to 10 keywords. E-mails should be entitled: BT3 Abstract Submission.

    Please use plain text (Times Roman 12) and abstain from using footnotes and any special formatting, characters or emphasis (such as bold, italics or underline). We acknowledge receipt and answer to all paper proposals submitted. If you do not receive a reply from us in a week you should assume we did not receive your proposal; it might be lost in cyberspace! We suggest, then, to look for an alternative electronic route or resend.

    Organising Chairs:

    The conference is part of the At the Interface programme of research projects. It aims to bring together people from different areas and interests to share ideas and explore various discussions which are innovative and exciting. All proposals accepted for and presented at the conference must be in English and will be eligible for publication in an ISBN eBook. Selected proposals may be developed for publication in a themed hard copy volume(s). All publications from the conference will require editors, to be chosen from interested delegates from the conference.

    Inter-Disciplinary.Net believes it is a mark of personal courtesy and professional respect to your colleagues that all delegates should attend for the full duration of the meeting. If you are unable to make this commitment, please do not submit an abstract for presentation.

    For further details of the conference, please visit:
    http://www.inter-disciplinary.net/at-the-interface/evil/body-horror/call-for-presentations/

    Please note: Inter-Disciplinary.Net is a not-for-profit network and we are not in a position to be able to assist with conference travel or subsistence.

  2. CFP: Special Edition of Disability and Society, ‘Disability: Who Counts? What Counts?’

    Posted on January 30th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Disability & Society

    Disability: Who Counts? What Counts?

    http://explore.tandfonline.com/cfp/ed/cdso-cfp

    The next Special Issue of Disability & Society will bring together cutting-edge discussion on questions of how changing sociopolitical and cultural relations are redefining disability and seeks to shape future directions for Disability Studies. Papers will consider new agendas for disability which are emerging as the 21st Century moves on, exploring ideas about categories of disability, disturbing categories, narrowing of the disability category, expanding of the disability category and interpretations of disability in cross-cultural and temporal contexts. The transformation of disability research and political action and their role in challenging conceptions of disability will also be of interest.

    We welcome contributions on a wide range of themes. The list below is not meant to be exhaustive and we encourage creative interpretation of topics which fit with matters of ‘who counts?’ and ‘what counts?’ in contemporary studies of disability and society.

    Topics you may wish to address include:

    • Mad Studies
    • Neoliberalism
    • Faith
    • Conflict
    • Medicine
    • Neurodiversity
    • Childhood and Identity
    • Poverty
    • Work
    • Disability and Development
    • Ageing

    This Special Issue will be published in 2015.

    Submission Procedures:

    Submissions should be made online at the Disability & Society ScholarOne Manuscript site.

    New users should first create an account. Once a user is logged onto the site submissions should be made via the Author Centre. Maximum word length is 7,000 words (including bibliography).

    The final deadline for receipt of papers is 31st August 2014.

  3. CFP: French Autopathography: Disability, Disease and Disorders

    Posted on January 29th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    French Autopathography: Disability, Disease and Disorders

    21st – 22nd November 2014

    Queen’s University Belfast, United Kingdom

    http://blogs.qub.ac.uk/frenchautopathography/2014/01/27/cfp/

     
    Coinciding with the rise in cases of cancer and AIDS from the 1980s onwards, the modern outbreak of patient-authored narratives of ill-health or incapacity has provided fresh perspectives to complement traditional medical literature and third-person illness narratives. Known as autopathographies, these patients’ tales give voice to the embodied experience of illness, suffering, disease and, following Thomas Couser’s definition, disability too. Acknowledging that the French tradition of autopathography can be traced back as far as Montaigne, this conference explores a rich but often-neglected corpus of first-person accounts across time-frames and disciplines in an effort to understand more fully what the sociologist Arthur Frank has called people’s need to ‘tell their stories’, be they of the plague, smallpox, syphilis, tuberculosis, leukaemia, cardiac disease, cancer, AIDS, motor neurone disease, eating disorders, stress disorders, or forms of disability (physical, cognitive, sensory, etc.), to name but a few. In this way, it interprets the term autopathography in its broadest sense, and embraces not only literature and creative writing, but also first-person documentary, visual, digital (eg. blogs) and other artistic and creative forms such as performance, dance, montage, sculpture, self-portraits or photography.

    Areas to be discussed may include, but are not limited to:

    • The structural and ideological issues that characterise French/francophone autopathographies
    • The subject as ‘narrative wreck’ [Frank]
    • Personal perspectives on French/francophone healthcare institutions and treatment processes
    • The ways in which the French language communicates pain, following Elaine Scarry’s remark that ‘physical pain does not simply resist language but actively destroys it’
    • The use of metaphor in self-authored accounts of illness or disability
    • French/francophone literature and/or art’s ‘restorative’ function [Deleuze]
    • Autopathography as genre? A challenge to the tenets of autobiographical writing? A new ‘pact’?
    • The relationship between autopathography and trauma narrative/testimony
    • Interfaces between autopathography and science/medicine in France/the French-speaking world
    • The impact of gender and/or class on illness formulations, attitudes to therapies etc.

    250-word proposals for 20-minute papers (or three-paper panels), in French or English, should be sent to Dr Steven Wilson by email attachment at the following address: steven.wilson@qub.ac.uk.

    The deadline for receipt of proposals is Friday 30th May 2014.

  4. PhD Studentships, Learning Disability History, Leeds and East London

    Posted on January 18th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

     

    The University of Leeds and the University of East London are recruiting two PhD students to join an AHRC funded, Open University led project ‘Developing a co-produced, digital, and living archive of learning disability history: An exploration of ethics, ownership and new connectivities’. The expected start date of the project is 31st March 2014.

     

    Project summary:

     
    The project will use a sustained participatory research methodology to investigate how a co-produced, distributed and ‘living’ archive of learning disability history can be developed and sustained.

    Studentship 1: School of Fine Arts, Art History and Cultural Studies, University of Leeds

    Studentship 2: The Rix Centre, University of East London

    Closing date: Tuesday 11th February 2014

     

    Follow this link for more details about the studentships, including how to apply: http://www3.open.ac.uk/employment/job-details.asp?id=7490&ref=ext

  5. Elenna Semino, ‘Metaphor in End-of-Life Care’, Glasgow University

    Posted on January 18th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    ‘Metaphor in End-of-Life Care’

    Elena Semino, Lancaster University

    Thursday 23rd January, 4.15pm

    Room 101, 12 University Gardens, School of Critical Studies, University of Glasgow

     

    Seminar summary:

    In this talk I provide an overview of the goals, methods and preliminary findings of the ESRC-funded project Metaphor in End-of-Life Care at Lancaster University (grant number: ES/J007927/1; http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/melc/). This project is concerned with the use of metaphor by members of three stakeholder groups involved in end-of-life care: patients, unpaid family carers and healthcare professionals. We combine ‘manual’ analysis and corpus linguistic methods to analyse the metaphors used in a 1.5-million-word corpus consisting of interviews and contributions to online fora by members of all three groups. I will present two sets of findings to date. First, I will discuss the metaphors used by thirteen UK-based hospice managers to describe what they see as ‘good’ and ‘bad’ deaths in the course of semi-structured interviews. I will show how the difference between good and bad deaths is partly expressed via contrasting metaphors, such as ‘accepting’ death as the ‘end’ of one’s ‘journey’ on the one hand, and, on the other hand, seeing death as an opponent against which to ‘struggle’, ‘battle’ or ‘fight’ in order to ‘keep going’. I will also revisit the controversial ‘WAR metaphor’ in relation to (terminal) illness by exploring the different ways in which it is used by patients in our data. Our analysis suggests that patients use a variety of WAR metaphors to talk about a wide range of experiences. Moreover, we have found that WAR metaphors can sometimes have a positive function, such as expressing personal determination and mutual solidarity. I will therefore argue that a blanket condemnation of WAR metaphors in the context of (terminal) illness should be replaced by a more nuanced understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of different types and uses of WAR metaphors in different contexts and by different stakeholders.

     

    Bionote:

    Elena Semino is Professor of Linguistics and Verbal Art and Head of the Department of Linguistics and English Language at Lancaster University. She is (co)-author of four books, including Metaphor in Discourse (2008, CUP) and Figurative Language, Genre and Register (2013, CUP; with Alice Deignan and Jeannette Littlemore). She is currently working on the ESRC-funded project ‘Metaphor in End-of-Life Care’ with: Jane Demmen, Andrew Hardie, Veronika Koller, Sheila Payne, Paul Rayson (Lancaster University), and Zsófia Demjén (Open University).

  6. CFP: ‘Disability: Who counts? What counts?’, Special Issue of Disability and Society

    Posted on January 13th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Call For Papers: Disability and Society Special Issue 2015

    Theme: Disability:  Who counts?  What counts?

    The next Special Issue of Disability & Society will bring together cutting-edge discussion on questions of how changing sociopolitical and cultural relations are redefining disability and seeks to shape future directions for Disability Studies. Papers will consider new agendas for disability which are emerging as the 21st Century moves on, exploring ideas about categories of disability, disturbing categories, narrowing of the disability category, expanding of the disability category and interpretations of disability in cross-cultural and temporal contexts. The transformation of disability research and political action and their role in challenging conceptions of disability will also be of interest.

    We welcome contributions on a wide range of themes. The list below is not meant to be exhaustive and we encourage creative interpretation of topics which fit with matters of‘who counts?’ and ‘what counts?’ in contemporary studies of disability and society.

    Topics you may wish to address include:

    • Mad Studies
    • Neoliberalism
    • Faith
    • Conflict
    • Medicine
    • Neurodiversity
    • Childhood and Identity
    • Poverty
    • Work
    • Disability and Development
    • Ageing

    This Special Issue will be published in 2015.

    Submissions should be made online at the Disability & Society ScholarOne Manuscript site .  New users should first create an account. Once a user is logged onto the site submissions should be made via the Author Centre.  Maximum word length is 7,000 words (including bibliography).

    The final deadline for receipt of papers is 31st August 2014.  No papers will be considered after this date.

    For further advice on the submission procedure go to: Disability and Society athttp://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09687599.asp

  7. CFP: ‘Literature and Bioethics’, Special Issue of Literature and Medicine

    Posted on January 10th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Special Issue, ‘Literature and Bioethics’, 33.2 Fall 2015, Literature and Medicine

    We invite manuscripts that examine the meanings of “literature” and “bioethics” and explore relationships between these two fields. Strong submissions that do not fit into the theme issue as it takes shape will also be considered for inclusion in general issues of the journal.

    Deadline for submission: 31st July 2014.

    Address inquiries to Catherine Belling, executive editor, Literature and Medicine: c-belling@northwestern.edu

    Call for Papers and Guidelines for Contributors:

    Literature and Medicine is a peer-reviewed journal publishing scholarship that explores representational and cultural practices concerning health care and the body. Areas of interest include disease, illness, and health; the cultures of biomedical science and technology and of the clinic; disability; and violence, trauma, and power relations as these are represented and interpreted in broadly-defined archives of verbal, visual, and material texts. Literature and Medicine features one thematic and one general issue each year. Past theme issues have explored identity and difference; contagion and infection; cancer pathography; the representations of genomics; and the narration of pain.

    Literature and Medicine is published semiannually. Theme issues are announced in calls for papers in the journal and on the journal website. Literature and Medicine editors will consider essay clusters devoted to a particular topic or written on a specific occasion. Submissions on any aspect of literature and medicine will be considered, but the journal rarely publishes short notes, personal essays, or creative writing. Authors are advised to look carefully at past issues of the journal (available on the journal website) before submitting their work. We welcome submissions by graduate students, but encourage authors to rework term papers into publishable manuscripts (as one does in turning dissertation into book) before submission.

    Manuscripts should be between 5,000 and 9,000 words in length. Please include an abstract of 100 – 150 words, and 3 – 5 keywords. All submissions should have text, end notes, and bibliography double-spaced and prepared according to guidelines in The Chicago Manual of Style, current edition. Authors will be responsible for securing permission to include visual images, figures, or verbal quotations that exceed fair use. Literature and Medicine is a peer-reviewed journal. Authors’ names should appear only on a cover sheet, and any identifiers in the text should be masked so manuscripts can be reviewed anonymously. Literature and Medicine reviews only unpublished manuscripts that are not simultaneously under review for publication elsewhere. Manuscripts must be submitted in digital form (.doc, .docx, or .rtf) through our website: http://lam.expressacademic.org/login.php

  8. PhD Studentship, Community Health and C21st Fiction, University of Leeds

    Posted on January 10th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Doctoral Studentship: ‘Representing Communities: Developing the Creative Power of People to Improve Health and Well-being’ at University of Leeds

    A funding opportunity at the University of Leeds for someone wanting to do PhD research on how questions of community health and wellbeing interact with twentieth-century literary fictions.

    The doctoral researcher will conduct an in-depth study of health and wellbeing as they are conceptualised, contextualised and interrogated in contemporary (mid-late 20th and 21st century) British fictions. There will be considerable scope for the successful applicant to determine the particular texts and communities under analysis, but in broad terms, he/she will focus on disadvantaged or stigmatised communities or demographic groups from England, Scotland, and/or Wales; this may include a focus on regional, working-class, ethnic minority, non-metropolitan and/or urban subcultural literatures. The project will consider some of the socioeconomic and cultural factors that affect health and wellbeing for particular communities (unemployment, poverty, post-industrial decline, migration, community stigmatisation, negative reputational geographies). Further details of the project and the application process are available here: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/arts/downloads/file/1894/ahrcesrc_phd_studentship_medical_humanities_february_2014

    The closing date for applications is 17th January 2014. For further information and informal advice on constructing an application, applicants are encouraged to contact Dr Clare Barker: c.f.barker@leeds.ac.uk.

  9. Learning Disability & Ethnicity Conference, Osmani Trust, London

    Posted on January 6th, 2014 by Hannah Tweed

    Learning Disability & Ethnicity Conference

    When: 28th March 2014

    Where: London, UK (at the Osmani Trust, Osmani Centre, 58 Underwood Road, London, E1 5AW)

    This one day conference will critically examine the role of ethnicity and its impact on learning disability and consider themes, perspectives and debates surroundings this area, so we can become more inclusive of these factors in practice and service delivery.

    This conference will bring together clinicians who have experience in providing health and social care interventions across fields.  Learning points and good practice will be shared. The challenges experienced and possible limitations will also discussed via anonymised case vignettes.

    Programme of the Day

    • 9.00 – 9.20: Registration, Tea and Coffee
    • 9.20 – 9.40: Professor Zenobia Nadirshaw (Chair & Introduction) ~ Double Discrimination: A Race Against Time for People with Learning Disabilities from BME Communities.
    • 9.40 – 10.30: Professor Eric Emerson ~ Ethnicity & Learning Disability: A Public Health Perspective.
    • 10.30 – 11.20: Dr. Sabiha Azmi ~ Developing and Delivering Psychological services for Adults with Learning Disabilities from Minority Ethnic Communities: A Case Study.
    • 11.20 – 11.40: Tea & Coffee
    • 11.40 – 12.30: Bridget Fisher ~ What Would Make A Difference? Listening and Responding to The Views of People with Learning Disabilities From Ethnic Minorities and Their Family Carers.
    • 12.30 – 12.50: Morning Q & A
    • 12.50 – 1.50: Lunch & Networking
    • 1.50 – 2.40: Professor Raghu Raghavan ~ Ethnicity and Learning Disability: Research and Its Implications For Policy and Practice.
    • 2.40 – 3.00: Tea & Coffee
    • 3.00 – 3.50: Professor Sab Bhaumik ~ “Mind the Gap” – Accessing Psychiatric Services for Minority Ethnic Adults with Learning Disability: The Problems and The Solutions.
    • 3.50 – 4.10: Afternoon Q&A
    • 4.10 – 4.30: Plenary, Closure & Evaluation sheets

    Conference Contact: Ahmed Qureshi (conference co-ordinator). Tel. 07540 356 526. For more information email info@bmehealth.org or visit us on www.bmehealth.org.